How to stop employees from using cell phones at work


how to stop employees from using cell phones at work

It's 1990 and you're waiting for an important phone call- you have two choices Employees can easily become preoccupied with personal conversations via. Cellphone and internet abuse at work. When you walk through your office, are you noticing employees making more personal calls or perhaps. There is no denying that mobile devices now play an essential role also allow employees to keep in touch with family and friends at work.
how to stop employees from using cell phones at work

: How to stop employees from using cell phones at work

How to stop employees from using cell phones at work
How to stop employees from using cell phones at work
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How to stop employees from using cell phones at work
BOSTON CELTICS GREATS

By Sean Captain4 minute Read

The Bill of Rights covers only what the government can do to you. Unless you work for the government, many of your rights to free speech and freedom from search and seizure stop when you walk in, or log in, to your job. “If you’re on your employer’s communications equipment, you’ve got virtually no privacy in theory and absolutely none in practice,” says Lew Maltby, head of the National Workrights Institute.

The lack of workplace digital privacy has become a hot topic with the recent firing of four Google employees for what Google says were violations such as unauthorized accessing of company documents and the workers say was retaliation for labor organizing or criticizing company policies. One of them, Rebecca Rivers, recounts how her personal Android phone went blank when she learned that she’d been placed on administrative leave in early November. (Google subsequently fired Rivers.)

“At nearly the exact same time, my personal phone was either corrupted or wiped,” she said at a Google worker rally in November. The loss was especially painful for Rivers, who is transgender. “Everything on my phone that was not backed up to the cloud was gone, including four months of my transition timeline photos, and I will never get those back,” she said, her voice quavering.

How did this how to stop employees from using cell phones at work Likely through an Android OS feature called a work profile, which allows employers to run work-related apps that the employer can access and manage remotely. Apple iOS has a similar capability called MDM, mobile device management, in which work apps run in a virtual “container” separate from personal apps. Various companies make MDM applications with varying levels of monitoring capabilities.

Everything on my phone that was not backed up to the cloud was gone.”

Rebecca Rivers

There are many legitimate reasons why a company might want to use this tech: It allows them to implement security measures for protecting company data in email and other apps that run in the separate work profile or container, for instance. They can easily install, uninstall, and update work apps without you having to bring the device in.

But they can also spy on you, or wipe out all your data—whether deliberately or negligently. That’s why mixing work networks and personal devices is a bad idea.

My smartphone is your smartphone

All modern phones have GPS capability. With a work profile or MDM toehold in your phone, an employer could install an app to track everywhere you go, as Owen Williams at OneZeropoints out. He gives the example of MDM maker Hexnode, which goes into great detail on how it can track device location at all times.

Williams also notes that a company may require your phone to connect to the internet through its encrypted virtual private network. This security measure makes sense for business, but it means that all of your data, even personal data, may be passing through the company’s network. That makes the data fair game for the company to look at, since there is simply no law or legal precedent to stop it. “That’s not really different from using your company’s desktop computer to send a personal email from your cubicle,” says attorney and security expert Frederick Lane. “If you send unencrypted personal data across a network owned and controlled by your employer, then you should assume that it can be captured and stored.”

Rivers recently tweeted a line of her employment contract that spells this out: “I have no reasonable expectation of privacy in any Google Property or in any other documents, equipment, or systems used to conduct the business of Google.” I asked Google about this policy. A spokeswoman said that it should not come as a surprise and is standard practice at large companies. A notice of the privacy policies also pops up when the phone profile is installed, she said.

What happens if you lose your data?

What Rivers hadn’t expected was losing personal data on her own device. But this is increasingly common, says Maltby, who calls it a bigger danger than being spied on. “They’re wiping your personal device with the goal of getting rid of the company data, but when you wipe the phone, you wipe everything,” he says.

Google told me that a suspended employee may lose personal data because they stored it in a work account, and they can ask Google to retrieve it for them.

When you wipe the phone, you wipe everything.”

Lew Maltby

It’s unclear exactly what happened to Rivers’s phone, or whether Google has a backup. But companies often completely wipe employees’ own phones without providing a way to back up personal information, Maltby says. “It’s not that they want to cause you trouble,” he says of employers. But “they would have to spend a little time and money to set up a system that would protect your privacy for the personal information that happens at work. And they don’t bother to do it.”

Worker advocates such as Maltby believe that total wiping of phones should be illegal under a law called the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act. The CFAA basically prohibits unauthorized access to a computing device, such as stealing data or planting malware. But advocates have struggled to find a legal case that can set a precedent for employee cellphones. “The courts insist on seeing tangible monetary damages, and usually there aren’t any,” Maltby says.

Of course, losing personal data, like photos documenting key moments of life, is so painful precisely because their value is intangible.

There’s also no way to put a monetary value on the hassle of carrying a second phone, or of fighting an employer that’s reluctant to pay for one. But placed side by side, securing your privacy is probably worth more than enduring some inconvenience.

Источник: https://www.fastcompany.com/90440073/if-you-use-your-personal-phone-for-work-say-goodbye-to-your-privacy
how to stop employees from using cell phones at work PCs Storage

Can You Ban Mobile Phones in the Workplace?

Mobile phones can be a massive distraction when at work and with how to stop employees from using cell phones at work recent survey by Statista showing that 96% of adults in the UK own a mobile phone and 8 out of 10 people bring that phone to work, it’s no wonder that employers may often consider a workplace wide ban.

But does completely restricting the use of phones during the work day reap any benefits or can it cause more problems?

If how to stop employees from using cell phones at work would like further advice on this issue from a professional HR consultant, or if you require support with creating and implementing a mobile phone policy, then please call us today on 0845 2626 260 or email us directly

What is the issue with allowing mobile phones in the workplace?

Research has found that having a personal phone to hand has a 48% negative impact on the quality of work and that, on average, up to 50 minutes of working hours are spent on a mobile phone every day doing non-work-related activities. This includes messaging friends, browsing social media or reading news articles.

This is not true for every employee, though, and can have broad variations amongst individuals with some people barely even looking at their phone all day, but it typically applies to younger staff / millennials.

Evidently, mobile phones can be a major distraction to both the employee with the phone pinging every half an hour and their colleagues around them. It could be causing employees to be less productive or under-perform so it is understandable that most employers might opt to have a strict mobile phone policy in place.

However, should this equate to a full-on ban of mobile phones at work?

How does a mobile phone ban work?

One industry that usually ‘bans’ mobile phones in the workplace are customer-facing roles such as retail workers, or those in the care sector.

In many cases, they ask employees to leave their phone in a locker or safe place with the rest of their belongings whilst they are working so that they are not distracted and can fully focus on serving customers or helping their patients and completing their work.

There are also industries where the use of mobile phones can be a health and safety hazard especially if you are working with machinery and could be distracted by a ringing phone in your pocket, or in cases where you are in a highly explosive or flammable work area.

The best way to implement a ban in instances like this would be to create a written policy and include it in employee handbooks and clearly communicate it to your staff. This policy will need to outline where employees should drop their phones at the start of the day and where they can pick them up during breaks or at the end of the day.

You may need to discuss this further in 1-2-1 meetings and you need to ensure that there is a safe and accessible space on the premises to keep employee phones for the duration of their work day.

You would also need to clearly state that you accept no liability for any damaged or stolen personal items whilst they are in your possession.

Should you ban mobile phones at work?

Before making a rash decision and banning mobile phones at work, you need to consider the important role that personal phones play and why a ban could do more harm than good.

For example, phones are an emergency line or connection to the ‘outside world’. An employee with children or a carer will need constant access to their phone should there be an urgent call from the school, childcare or their dependent.

Similarly, if an employee’s family member has an accident or falls ill then they would need access to their phone to be kept up to date on their well-being.

There are ways to work around this, such as having a main line/reception contact number that your employees can provide as their emergency contact so that they can still be reached whilst at work.

But you should also weigh up the practical implications with the effect on employer-employee relationship such as, could a mobile phone ban cause resentment, might it lead to a decrease in retention rates, does it appear as though you don’t trust your employees?

These are all things that you would need to consider before imposing a mobile phone ban.

What about creating a more relaxed mobile phone policy?

It’s safe to say there will always be distractions in the workplace and a mobile phone is probably the least of your worries.

We’re living in an age where many of us are attached to our phones to the point where it becomes an extension of us and so taking that away can cause a lot of issues and even a little hysteria.

We would advise that you give your employees trust and freedom by not enforcing such a strict ban.

Plus, if they are performing well how to stop employees from using cell phones at work generally well behaved then does it really matter that they reply to the text from their mum, check their weather app or browse the news every couple of hours. The most important thing is that their work is getting done to a high standard and they are not causing you any issues or hassle.

However, if you notice that some employees are being negatively affected by having their mobile phone with them at work, or you want to ensure that things don’t get out of hand with phone usage, then you can create a relaxed mobile phone policy that is included in your employee handbooks.

This policy should outline any rules over the use of personal mobile phones in the workplace, such as forbidding certain activities like game playing, posting on social media or shopping, and state that phones must be kept on silent or vibrate-only during working hours.

You can also request that personal phone calls must be made only during breaks unless it is an emergency and your supervisor has been notified, and you can add that phones are not to be taken to the bathroom or into meetings.

Furthermore, if your employee’s role requires them to use a phone whether it be to make calls to clients or to manage social media accounts, then you should provide them with a work phone to do so.

These fair restrictions can help lessen the distraction that mobile phones can sometimes cause without enforcing any oppressive rules.

Of course, if an employee does consistently break these rules and is found to be misusing their phone during working hours then it can become a disciplinary issue.

All in all, mobile phone bans should be decided on a how to stop employees from using cell phones at work by case basis as there are some roles and industries where a ban is encouraged for GDPR and safety reasons.

One such example would be teachers or anyone who works with children.

By having a mobile phone to hand, there is an increased risk of photos being taken or personal information about the company/children being shared publicly.

Sometimes a strict social media policy and mobile phone policy can discourage this; however, it would be far safer to remove the temptation completely by enforcing a ‘no mobile phones at work’ rule and taking them from your employees before they enter the premises.

Mobile phone bans are a complex workplace issue. If you would like further advice on this or you have a disciplinary issue due to the misuse of mobile phones, then contact our professional HR consultants today. Call us on 0845 2626 260 for a no-obligation quote for our services

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Источник: https://www.guardiansupport.co.uk/blog/can-you-ban-mobile-phones-in-the-workplace/
Servers

Workplace Productivity in an Era of Smartphones

Introduction

Can you picture the world without smartphones? A time when we used payphones on the side of the street or in the store? I can. It's 1990 and you're waiting for an important phone call- you have two choices which are to wait until you finally receive the call or have your answering machine record it to the cassette tape.


Or you are out on the town and need to check in with the babysitter to make sure the kids are alright, so you search for the nearest payphone. You work at a large factory and your boss is looking for you, but it is very noisy and you don't hear the overhead speaker paging you, so your boss sends his secretary to walk around the building to find you.


Lastly, you are on vacation and get lost. Hopefully, you have a map in your car or went to AAA to get the latest paper maps. These are examples of what life was like before smartphones were introduced.

Culture

The way of life in today's society has changed due to the rapid increases in advances of technology and the introduction of smartphones. We have become a society of instantaneous contact, therefore, if people do not have contact with certain family members or friends on a consistent basis, he or she could feel the stress and pressure of the "un-known."


Some situations that were acceptable prior to smartphones is not necessarily acceptable in today's society. Whether you're an eight year old, teenager, business man/woman, or parent, dependency exists on the easy access and the need to have a smartphone in hand at all times whether at home, work, or school.


People go into panic mode if he or she were to leave the house without these technological devices. Some people describe leaving their smartphones at home as "feeling naked." Smartphones have become part of the everyday lives of everyone in society.


Therefore, employers need to recognize this and chase bank pensacola hours the benefits of smartphones and provide certain regulations when these devices are used too often where it negatively impacts the workplace.

Distractions

There are several types of distractions relating to smartphones which negatively influences and interrupts the focus of many employees. We have all been there- our smartphone screen lights up, vibrates or rings that is initiated from an incoming phone call, text message, or social media notification.


This directly contributes to the distractions that exist which impacts the concentration level of an employee. It is close to impossible for an individual to ignore any notification, pointless or important, when he or she is in the workplace. It takes a lot of self-control to ignore notifications that do not require immediate attention.


Employees can easily become preoccupied with personal conversations via texting or social media. It often will take more time for the employee to regain focus to continue his or her work related tasks.


Research proves that it is easier to tune out a two-way conversation or another employee talking on the business phone compared to personal conversations conducted on smartphones. There was a scientific study done by the researchers at the University of San Diego testing the effects of smartphone vs. actual conversations (Walton, 2013).


Veronica Galvan, who was a lead researcher in the experiment, states that smartphone conversations are more distracting to people than hearing a two-way conversation. In this generation, every employee owns a smartphone therefore this suggests that there are more distractions in the workplace today compared to earlier generations.

Texting

Text messaging is the number one form of communication amongst smartphone users. This has influenced the way individuals in today's society communicate with one another. While at the workplace, texting can have a positive benefit of gaining quicker contact of other employees and clients but it can also interfere with the level of productivity if the amount of time spent texting is abused.  


Some employees can exceed the average amount of time spent texting throughout the work day, which can decrease productivity and concentration levels. There are daily situations that increase productivity and decrease the amount of time it takes for certain tasks to be completed in the workplace.


Employees and clients can send notifications and updates more quickly than an email. An email requires an individual to be logged into his or her email account compared to a text message that is sent directly to a phone number and does not require that extra step of "logging-in."


A date or time change for a meeting or conference call can be texted directly to the individual to save time and allow everyone involved to know immediately. This can be helpful for individuals who have unpredictable work schedules or have last minute meetings that are scheduled at the convenience of clients and customers.


Reminders can be set for important conference calls or meetings, which would send a notification directly to the smartphone usually fifteen minutes prior. When productivity increases, it drastically how to stop employees from using cell phones at work the ability to multi-task to complete more responsibilities and meet all deadlines appropriately.

The Positive Aspects of Smartphone Usage in the Workplace

Convenience is a crucial aspect that all organizations and firms look to obtain for their employees. Smartphones provide the ability for employees and clients to communicate and contact one another quickly and efficiently. Before smartphones were introduced, contacting other customers and clients on their office phone and dealing with automated systems was considered the "norm."  


In today's society, that is almost unheard of since it is easier and more convenient to connect with another client on his or her smartphone since these devices are so readily available. If an individual does not respond to a simple text message, e-mail, or phone call within a certain period of time, this individual can be considered "rude" for potentially ignoring the notification on his or her smartphone.


Conflicts are resolved faster when smartphones are a possible form of communication. Timely phone systems or secretaries can transfer errors or miscommunications to upper management or other employees who receive a message while he or she is away from their desk.


Contacting a personal smartphone and avoiding the "middleman" between employees and clients can increase the personal feeling amongst the company and its employees (Chron Small Business). Contacting an individual on their personal smartphone can increase the probability that an urgent message regarding a meeting that day or even the next hour is received on time.


According to the University of Kansas study "Smartphone Micro-breaks During Work Day are Productive," employees should be given a few short breaks throughout the day.  This has proven an increase in productivity mission san jose fremont more deadlines being met before or on time. These mini-breaks how to stop employees from using cell phones at work the day allow employees to take their minds off any potential work stress and "refresh" his or her mind.  


The University of Kansas study says "workers who use their phones for short breaks throughout the day tend to be happier and how to stop employees from using cell phones at work navy federal credit union certificate of deposit rates more positive attitude." According to this study, employees spend an average of 22 minutes per eight-hour work day on his or her personal phone. This statistic is approximately three minutes each hour.

The Negative Aspects of Smartphone Usage in the Workplace

Communication is extremely important in order to prevent any misconstruing or misinterpretations in the workplace amongst employees, management, HR professionals and clients. Face-to-face interactions have diminished a great deal due to the rapid increase in smartphones.


There has been a limitation placed on personal relationships with employees, management and clients by relying solely on technology. According to the resource, The Negative Effects of Cellphones (2013) "relationships in the real world are affected when they are substituted for electronic ones".

People in today's society have become accustomed to communicating daily through text messaging, e-mailing, and social media since it is convenient and a quick way of connecting with others. This has a downfall to it considering no one bothers to pay attention to the people around them.  


This affects performance, alters relationships, and decreases networking and making business mission san jose fremont with others. Smartphones have become a major distraction in the workplace, which is a main issue that affects the quality of an employee's work and his or her concentration level.


According to a study from Carnegie Mellon University's Human-Computer Interaction Lab, "researchers found that the average office worker gets about 11 minutes in between each interruption, but takes about 25 minutes to return to completing the original task after each interruption" ("The Negative Effects of Cellphones," 2013).  


Networking and making connections is extremely important in the business world today. Long-lasting relationships develop from in-person contact. Even though technology makes it easier to stay connected, this has been negated by making it difficult to begin and maintain relationships without the personal interaction.


The interpretation of messages and the meaning behind the way certain words are typed and perceived has been drastically changed due to the consistent daily use of smartphones and similar technological devices. Facial expressions and personal interaction play a huge role in defining how an individual feels about something.  


The way an individual would text or email a personal friend verse a client could be completely different. "Have a great day!" or "Have a great day." could be interpreted differently when typing an email to a client.  


A friendlier vibe is given with the exclamation point opposed to the period. In both instances, the employee could have meant "Have a great day" in a heartwarming, friendly way but the punctuation can alter how this is interpreted.

The Effects of Policy & Procedure on Employee Morale and Productivity

There are certain policies and procedures that can be issued based on the usage of smartphones and other similar devices in the workplace. Some options are: a zero-tolerance policy, case-by-case, break-time only, or a reasonable use policy. In an article written by Rebecca Mazin from AllBusiness.com, she believes that the best way to go about "electronics communications policy" is to structure it around the organization's corporate culture.


Depending on the size of the company and its corresponding culture, certain policies and procedures could be more or less appropriate. Selecting a policy that is not structured around the organization's culture can cause risk and negative effects on employee morale and productivity.

Sources

1. Doucette, C. (n.d.). Positive effects of cellphone technology in the workplace. Retrieved October 17, 2014, from http://smallbusiness.chron.com/

2. Mazin, R. (n.d.). It's time to tame workplace texting. Retrieved October 26, 2014, from http://www.allbusiness.com/allbusiness-stop-workplace-texting/16706751-1.html

3. Noell, M. (2014). Study: smartphone "microbreaks" during work day are productive. Retrieved October 18, 2014, from http://www.kltv.com/story/26044621/study-smartphone-          microbreaks-during-work-day-are-productive

‍4. The Negative Effects of Cellphones in the Workplace. (2013, December 3). Retrieved November 1, 2014, from http://polygrafi.com/2013/12/03/the-negative-affects-of-cell-phones-in-the-workplace/

5. Walton, A. G. (2013, 03 13). Science proves that cell phones are annoying and distracting. Retrieved October 25, 2014, from      http://www.forbes.com/sites/alicegwalton/2013/03/13/science-proves-that-cell-phones-are-annoying-and-distracting/

Learn about how you can become a Certified Corporate Wellness Specialist→Источник: https://www.corporatewellnessmagazine.com/article/workplace-productivity-in-an-era-of-smartphones

Most of us sense instinctively that the rise of smartphones has had a dramatic impact on the way we work and live. We know it’s made us more connected and available, better able to communicate with colleagues and clients, and quicker to respond to opportunities as they arise. But just how much it can boost productivity has been a mystery — until now.

Mobile Devices Pollos asados don jose Productivity

Samsung recently teamed up with Frost & Sullivan to survey 500 managers and executives working at companies how to stop employees from using cell phones at work government organizations in the U.S. to learn more about their use of mobile devices and applications in the workplace. The results are remarkable: Respondents report that as a result of using smartphones to get work done, they gain nearly an hour (58 minutes) of work time each day and nearly an hour (58 minutes) of personal time each day on average, and see an estimated productivity increase of a whopping 34 percent. The minutes gained are slightly higher for very large enterprises, while the efficiency increase is strongest among mid-size organizations. Either way, that’s a lot of measurable value.

The use of smartphone apps for business has nearly doubled over the past five years. Today, 51 percent of employees use mandated apps for their business on their phones, up from 27 percent in 2011. (That doesn’t take into account the apps employees use on their own to get work done, without the knowledge of IT.) Custom business apps are now used by the majority of employees in the financial services, healthcare and transportation industries.

Unsurprisingly, smartphones are becoming a primary business and productivity tool: 58 percent of respondents say they always or usually use them for business and productivity applications. Companies are using a mix of custom in-house, custom third-party and app store applications to drive productivity.

According to a Frost $ Sullivan study, smartphones save business users 58 minutes each day and increase productivity 34%.

Benefits Across the Board

Smartphones are providing a variety of benefits: 42 percent of respondents say they help increase the speed of innovation; many also tout greater flexibility (41 percent), an improvement in the quality of collaboration and the ability to boost productivity (each at 39 percent), and how to stop employees from using cell phones at work improvement in the quality of their work (35 percent).

More than one-third of respondents see a positive effect on work-life balance, although many also report feeling pressured to stay connected more often. To offset this concern, companies should put clear workplace communication policies in place outlining when employees are expected to be available, and how they should best interact with one another — and their business applications — outside of typical business hours.

Smartphone Productivity, Quantified

White Paper

Read the Frost & Sullivan white paper to learn the tangible benefits of smartphones in the enterprise. Download Now

The BYOD trend is widespread (84 percent) across all industries, with most companies allowing employees and even partners to access the corporate network via their own devices. But as a result, data security is a top concern for 52 percent of respondents, especially in regulated industries, and more than two-thirds view the security risks posed by employees and partners with smartphones as very or somewhat significant. To mitigate these risks, companies are using encryption (46 percent), VPNs (43 percent) and authentication (38 percent).

Mobility Offers an Edge

Despite these great results, smartphones are still provided to employees less often (27 percent) than desktop PCs (62 percent) or laptop computers (43 percent), but they’re the top personal device (73 percent) used for business. This suggests that many companies haven’t caught up to the new workplace reality. Frost & Sullivan believes that smart companies will take advantage of this gap to get a quick leg up on the competition in the months and years to come. By outfitting their employees with smartphones now, companies can see dramatic results around productivity, workplace communication, time management and work-life balance — all of which contribute to the bottom line.

Samsung’s line ofenterprise-ready smartphonesprovide the power, performance and security essential for today’s mobile workforce.

Источник: https://insights.samsung.com/2016/08/03/employees-say-smartphones-boost-productivity-by-34-percent-frost-sullivan-research/

How to stop employees from using cell phones at work -

How do you stop employees from using cell phones at work?

Establish guidelines and policies. Spell out whether phones should be turned off during meetings or set on vibrate while people are on the clock, or whether there’s a limit on the number of calls an employee can make or take during the workday. Set consequences for violations.

Can an employer restrict cell phones?

Yes, you can limit or even prohibit use of cell phones during work hours. Employees can be expected to give their undivided attention to the work you pay them to perform, and if that means cell phones need to be turned off or put away, you are entitled to make this request.

Are cell phone a distraction?

Not surprisingly, the evidence suggests that cell phones generally are a distraction for students. A study on laptops in a simulated classroom found that students in the vicinity of another student who was multitasking on a laptop during class scored worse on a test than those who were not near multitaskers.

How do phones affect productivity?

A 2017 survey from staffing firm OfficeTeam found the average office employee spends 56 minutes per day using their cell phone during work hours for non-work activity, adding up to just under five hours a week of lost productivity, per employee.

What are the worst phone habits?

Stop These 7 Bad Smartphone Habits Right Now

  • 2 / 8 1. Constantly checking your phone.
  • 3 / 8 2. Obsessing over social media.
  • 4 / 8 3. Scrolling before bed.
  • 5 / 8 4. Not cleaning the screen.
  • 6 / 8 5. Hunching over to type.
  • 7 / 8 6. Shutting out your surroundings.
  • 8 / 8 7. Staring at your phone for hours.

How do cell phones handle the workplace?

Assuming your employer doesn’t have a rule forbidding cell phone use at work, here are some rules to follow:

  1. Put Your Phone Away.
  2. Turn Off Your Ringer.
  3. Use Your Cell Phone for Important Calls Only.
  4. Let Voicemail Pick Up Your Calls.
  5. Find a Private Place to Make Cell Phone Calls.
  6. Don’t Bring Your Cell Phone Into the Restroom.

Do phones affect your brain?

Cognitive Ability Recent research suggests that smartphone usage does indeed have an effect on the brain, although the long-term effects remain to be seen.

Do cell phones affect memory?

Increasing exposure to mobile devices negatively affects the figural memory of adolescents, revealed a recent study by the researchers at Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH). Figural memory, which helps us make sense of images, patterns and shapes, is located in the right hemisphere of the brain.

Can cell phones become addictive?

What researchers do agree on is the fact that adolescents are more likely to demonstrate addiction-like symptoms with their cell phone use than other age groups. Studies show that cell phone use peaks during the teen years and gradually declines thereafter.

Do mobile phones cause more harm than good?

According to a 1- year study done by the World Health Organization, cell phone devices can lead to cancer. Since cell phones are capable of such harmful effects on the population of cell phone users, it is clear that cell phones do more harm than good.

Do phones make you dumber?

Smartphones make us forgetful There’s about 30 years of research showing that people who read something on a screen will remember 10 to 30 per cent less of the material compared to reading the same material on paper.

Is texting making us dumber?

A linguistic study found that people who regularly text message are less likely to accept new words, as opposed to those that read more traditional print media such as books, magazines, and newspapers.

Are smartphones making us lazy thinkers?

They make us lazy more than dumb. A lot of people, and even some studies, have come to the conclusion that smartphones make us less smart. But a University of Waterloo study (subscription required) provides some nuance and deeper understanding as to exactly what smartphones do to us. Turns out they can make us lazy.

Do phones make you smarter?

Bill Nye the Science Guy says that smart phones can actually make you smarter, because they help free up memory you’d normally use for mundane information, so you can use it for something else. Don’t plan to use your smart phone’s GPS, because if the battery dies, or your phone goes out of range, you could get lost.

Is technology make us smarter or dumber?

Historically, technology has made us individually dumber and individually smarter—and collectively smarter. Technology has made us able to do more while understanding less about what we are doing, and has increased our dependence on others.

How do smartphones affect us?

Smartphones Can Impair Social and Emotional Skills Kaufer said. Because smartphones and other devices give information and entertainment rapidly, they can make us less patient with real conversation with people in our lives. Also, that lack of face-to-face interaction can lead to depression.

Why technology is making us smarter?

Instead of simply learning by remembering, we learn to learn quickly and efficiently. Yes, we think and learn differently when we use technology. But we become less set in our ways, more able to adapt to changing information, and more able to make judgements. These are all ways of being smarter, not less able.

How does technology affect us?

Social media and mobile devices may lead to psychological and physical issues, such as eyestrain and difficulty focusing on important tasks. They may also contribute to more serious health conditions, such as depression. The overuse of technology may have a more significant impact on developing children and teenagers.

Is technology making us less social?

While technology offers greater connectivity among people and things than ever before, it is really making people less sociable or even anti-social. We are forgetting the value of face-to-face interactions to create more important and sustainable relationships.

Is technology making us more intelligent?

Historically, technology has made us individually dumber and individually smarter – and collectively smarter. Technology has made us able to do more while understanding less about what we are doing, and has increased our dependence on others.

How technology is making us better?

Technology Has Made Our Lives Far Easier And Better Through Better Communication. The role of technology has successfully made the communication aspect much easier and better for us humans. The user experience and interface have drastically improved with the upcoming modern age technology.

Does the Internet make you dumber?

The quote by Carr is simply saying that the use of the internet can make us less interesting in terms of our thinking process. He provokes emotion through this quote with just the word “Sacrifice”.

Does technology make people feel alone?

Studies warn that relying on technology to communicate can reduce our enjoyment of face-to-face interactions, make us feel more anxious, and undermine our mental wellbeing. Loneliness may also be more painfully felt online, where exposure to idealised images of friends can result in negative social comparisons.

Do cell phones promote loneliness?

The findings of some studies have indicated that problematic use of mobile phones has negative effects.. Jin and Park (2012) found that more face-to-face interactions were associated with lower levels of loneliness; however, more cell phone calling was associated with greater loneliness.

Does social media make us lonely?

While there is evidence of more loneliness among heavy social media users, there is also evidence suggesting social media use decreases loneliness among highly social people. Thus, it is not social media itself, but the way we integrate it into our existing lives which impacts loneliness.

Does Internet make us lonely?

Specifically, a recent experimental study by Robert Kraut et al. (1998) found that greater use of the Internet decreases communication within the family, diminishes the size of the subjects’ local social networks, and increases feelings of loneliness and depression.

Источник: https://www.mvorganizing.org/how-do-you-stop-employees-from-using-cell-phones-at-work/
Data Centers Источник: https://www.zdnet.com/article/stop-using-your-work-laptop-or-phone-for-personal-stuff-because-i-know-you-are/
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Workplace Productivity in an Era of Smartphones

Introduction

Can you picture the world without smartphones? A time when we used payphones on the side of the street or in the store? I can. It's 1990 and you're waiting for an important phone call- you have two choices which are to wait until you finally receive the call or have your answering machine record it to the cassette tape.


Or you are out on the town and need to check in with the babysitter to make sure the kids are alright, so you search for the nearest payphone. You work at a large factory and your boss is looking for you, but it is very noisy and you don't hear the overhead speaker paging you, so your boss sends his secretary to walk around the building to find you.


Lastly, you are on vacation and get lost. Hopefully, you have a map in your car or went to AAA to get the latest paper maps. These are examples of what life was like before smartphones were introduced.

Culture

The way of life in today's society has changed due to the rapid increases in advances of technology and the introduction of smartphones. We have become a society of instantaneous contact, therefore, if people do not have contact with certain family members or friends on a consistent basis, he or she could feel the stress and pressure of the "un-known."


Some situations that were acceptable prior to smartphones is not necessarily acceptable in today's society. Whether you're an eight year old, teenager, business man/woman, or parent, dependency exists on the easy access and the need to have a smartphone in hand at all times whether at home, work, or school.


People go into panic mode if he or she were to leave the house without these technological devices. Some people describe leaving their smartphones at home as "feeling naked." Smartphones have become part of the everyday lives of everyone in society.


Therefore, employers need to recognize this and utilize the benefits of smartphones and provide certain regulations when these devices are used too often where it negatively impacts the workplace.

Distractions

There are several types of distractions relating to smartphones which negatively influences and interrupts the focus of many employees. We have all been there- our smartphone screen lights up, vibrates or rings that is initiated from an incoming phone call, text message, or social media notification.


This directly contributes to the distractions that exist which impacts the concentration level of an employee. It is close to impossible for an individual to ignore any notification, pointless or important, when he or she is in the workplace. It takes a lot of self-control to ignore notifications that do not require immediate attention.


Employees can easily become preoccupied with personal conversations via texting or social media. It often will take more time for the employee to regain focus to continue his or her work related tasks.


Research proves that it is easier to tune out a two-way conversation or another employee talking on the business phone compared to personal conversations conducted on smartphones. There was a scientific study done by the researchers at the University of San Diego testing the effects of smartphone vs. actual conversations (Walton, 2013).


Veronica Galvan, who was a lead researcher in the experiment, states that smartphone conversations are more distracting to people than hearing a two-way conversation. In this generation, every employee owns a smartphone therefore this suggests that there are more distractions in the workplace today compared to earlier generations.

Texting

Text messaging is the number one form of communication amongst smartphone users. This has influenced the way individuals in today's society communicate with one another. While at the workplace, texting can have a positive benefit of gaining quicker contact of other employees and clients but it can also interfere with the level of productivity if the amount of time spent texting is abused.  


Some employees can exceed the average amount of time spent texting throughout the work day, which can decrease productivity and concentration levels. There are daily situations that increase productivity and decrease the amount of time it takes for certain tasks to be completed in the workplace.


Employees and clients can send notifications and updates more quickly than an email. An email requires an individual to be logged into his or her email account compared to a text message that is sent directly to a phone number and does not require that extra step of "logging-in."


A date or time change for a meeting or conference call can be texted directly to the individual to save time and allow everyone involved to know immediately. This can be helpful for individuals who have unpredictable work schedules or have last minute meetings that are scheduled at the convenience of clients and customers.


Reminders can be set for important conference calls or meetings, which would send a notification directly to the smartphone usually fifteen minutes prior. When productivity increases, it drastically impacts the ability to multi-task to complete more responsibilities and meet all deadlines appropriately.

The Positive Aspects of Smartphone Usage in the Workplace

Convenience is a crucial aspect that all organizations and firms look to obtain for their employees. Smartphones provide the ability for employees and clients to communicate and contact one another quickly and efficiently. Before smartphones were introduced, contacting other customers and clients on their office phone and dealing with automated systems was considered the "norm."  


In today's society, that is almost unheard of since it is easier and more convenient to connect with another client on his or her smartphone since these devices are so readily available. If an individual does not respond to a simple text message, e-mail, or phone call within a certain period of time, this individual can be considered "rude" for potentially ignoring the notification on his or her smartphone.


Conflicts are resolved faster when smartphones are a possible form of communication. Timely phone systems or secretaries can transfer errors or miscommunications to upper management or other employees who receive a message while he or she is away from their desk.


Contacting a personal smartphone and avoiding the "middleman" between employees and clients can increase the personal feeling amongst the company and its employees (Chron Small Business). Contacting an individual on their personal smartphone can increase the probability that an urgent message regarding a meeting that day or even the next hour is received on time.


According to the University of Kansas study "Smartphone Micro-breaks During Work Day are Productive," employees should be given a few short breaks throughout the day.  This has proven an increase in productivity and more deadlines being met before or on time. These mini-breaks throughout the day allow employees to take their minds off any potential work stress and "refresh" his or her mind.  


The University of Kansas study says "workers who use their phones for short breaks throughout the day tend to be happier and have a more positive attitude." According to this study, employees spend an average of 22 minutes per eight-hour work day on his or her personal phone. This statistic is approximately three minutes each hour.

The Negative Aspects of Smartphone Usage in the Workplace

Communication is extremely important in order to prevent any misconstruing or misinterpretations in the workplace amongst employees, management, HR professionals and clients. Face-to-face interactions have diminished a great deal due to the rapid increase in smartphones.


There has been a limitation placed on personal relationships with employees, management and clients by relying solely on technology. According to the resource, The Negative Effects of Cellphones (2013) "relationships in the real world are affected when they are substituted for electronic ones".

People in today's society have become accustomed to communicating daily through text messaging, e-mailing, and social media since it is convenient and a quick way of connecting with others. This has a downfall to it considering no one bothers to pay attention to the people around them.  


This affects performance, alters relationships, and decreases networking and making business connections with others. Smartphones have become a major distraction in the workplace, which is a main issue that affects the quality of an employee's work and his or her concentration level.


According to a study from Carnegie Mellon University's Human-Computer Interaction Lab, "researchers found that the average office worker gets about 11 minutes in between each interruption, but takes about 25 minutes to return to completing the original task after each interruption" ("The Negative Effects of Cellphones," 2013).  


Networking and making connections is extremely important in the business world today. Long-lasting relationships develop from in-person contact. Even though technology makes it easier to stay connected, this has been negated by making it difficult to begin and maintain relationships without the personal interaction.


The interpretation of messages and the meaning behind the way certain words are typed and perceived has been drastically changed due to the consistent daily use of smartphones and similar technological devices. Facial expressions and personal interaction play a huge role in defining how an individual feels about something.  


The way an individual would text or email a personal friend verse a client could be completely different. "Have a great day!" or "Have a great day." could be interpreted differently when typing an email to a client.  


A friendlier vibe is given with the exclamation point opposed to the period. In both instances, the employee could have meant "Have a great day" in a heartwarming, friendly way but the punctuation can alter how this is interpreted.

The Effects of Policy & Procedure on Employee Morale and Productivity

There are certain policies and procedures that can be issued based on the usage of smartphones and other similar devices in the workplace. Some options are: a zero-tolerance policy, case-by-case, break-time only, or a reasonable use policy. In an article written by Rebecca Mazin from AllBusiness.com, she believes that the best way to go about "electronics communications policy" is to structure it around the organization's corporate culture.


Depending on the size of the company and its corresponding culture, certain policies and procedures could be more or less appropriate. Selecting a policy that is not structured around the organization's culture can cause risk and negative effects on employee morale and productivity.

Sources

1. Doucette, C. (n.d.). Positive effects of cellphone technology in the workplace. Retrieved October 17, 2014, from http://smallbusiness.chron.com/

2. Mazin, R. (n.d.). It's time to tame workplace texting. Retrieved October 26, 2014, from http://www.allbusiness.com/allbusiness-stop-workplace-texting/16706751-1.html

3. Noell, M. (2014). Study: smartphone "microbreaks" during work day are productive. Retrieved October 18, 2014, from http://www.kltv.com/story/26044621/study-smartphone-          microbreaks-during-work-day-are-productive

‍4. The Negative Effects of Cellphones in the Workplace. (2013, December 3). Retrieved November 1, 2014, from http://polygrafi.com/2013/12/03/the-negative-affects-of-cell-phones-in-the-workplace/

5. Walton, A. G. (2013, 03 13). Science proves that cell phones are annoying and distracting. Retrieved October 25, 2014, from      http://www.forbes.com/sites/alicegwalton/2013/03/13/science-proves-that-cell-phones-are-annoying-and-distracting/

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