How old is the united states of america

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how old is the united states of america

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how old is the united states of america

How old is the united states of america -

The question “How old is America?” is both a simple and complex question to answer, depending on how you want to measure age.

We’re going to start with the simple and then move onto the complex.

How Old Is America? – the Simple Answer

Constitution

The simple answer is that as of the 4th of July 2021, the United States is 245 years old. It’s 245-years-old because the Declaration of Independence was ratified by the US Second Continental Congress on July 4, 1776.

The passing of the Declaration of Independence meant that the thirteen original British colonies in North America ceased to be colonies and officially (at least according to them) became a sovereign nation.

READ MORE:Colonial America

But, as I said before, this is just the simple answer and the simple answer may or may not be correct depending on when you count the birth of a nation.

Here are 9 other potential birth dates and ages for the United States of America.


Recommended Reading


Birthday 2. The Formation of a Continent (200 million years old)

The North American Continent

If you believe the age of the United States should be counted from when the North American landmass first separated from the rest of the surrounding world, the US would be celebrating it’s 200 millionth birthday!

Good luck trying to find a Hallmark card for that one… 🙂

It separated from a landmass known as Laurentia (Lauren, to her friends) which also contained Eurasia, around 200 million years ago.

Birthday 3. The Arrival of the Native Americans (15,000-40,000 years old)

The arrival of Native Americans

If you believe the age of the United States should be counted from when the Native Americans first set foot on the North American continent, then the age of the United States is somewhere between 15,000 and 40,000-years-old.

It’s believed the first Native Americans arrived between 13,000 B.C.E and 38,000 B.C.E via a land bridge connecting North America to Siberia. Hallmark still isn’t coming to the party on this one, but I’d LOVE to see a birthday cake stacked with 13,000+ candles!

Birthday 4. The Arrival of Christopher Columbus (528 years old)

Arrival of Christopher Columbus

If you believe the age of the United States should be counted from when Christopher Columbus ‘discovered’ America, landing on the ‘uninhabited’ (if you don’t count the somewhere between 8 million and 112 million Native Americans) shores of North America, then the United States is 528 years old.

He set sail on the evening of August 3, 1492, in three ships: the Nina, the Pinta, and the Santa Maria. It took roughly 10 weeks to find the Americas, and on October 12, 1492, he set foot in the Bahamas with a group of sailors from the Santa Maria.

However, given the ugly events of the next few years surrounding European colonization in the Americas, celebrating this date as America’s birthday has fallen largely out of favor. In fact, in many places in the United States, people have stopped celebrating the anniversary of Columbus’ arrival to the America’s because of a better understanding of the impact this had on indigenous populations.

Birthday 5. The First Settlement (434 years old)

Roanoke Island

If you believe the age of the United States should be counted from when the first settlement was established, then the United States is 434 years old.

The first settlement was established on Roanoke Island in 1587, however, all was not well. The harsh conditions and lack of supplies meant that by the time some of the original settlers arrived back on the island with supplies in 1590, the settlement appeared to be completely abandoned with no sign of the original inhabitants.

Birthday 6. The First SUCCESSFUL Settlement (412 years old)

Jamestown

If you believe the age of the United States should be counted from when the first successful settlement was established, then the age of the United States is 412 years old.

The failure of Roanoke Island didn’t deter the British. In a joint venture with the Virginia Company, they established a second settlement at Jamestown in 1609. Once again, the harsh conditions, aggressive natives, and lack of supplies made life on the continental US very tough (they even resorted to cannibalism to survive at one point), but the settlement was ultimately successful.

Birthday 7. The Articles of Confederation (240 years old)

How Old Is the United States of America? 4

If you believe the age of the United States should be counted from the Articles of Confederation were ratified, then the United States is 240-years-old.

The Articles of Confederation laid the framework for how the states were to operate in their ‘League of Friendship’ (their words, not mine) and were the guiding principles behind the decision-making process of Congress.

The articles were debated for more than a year (July 1776 – November 1777) before being sent to the states for ratification on November 15th. They were finally ratified and came into force on March 1st, 1781.

Birthday 8. The Ratification of the Constitution (233 years old)

Signing of the US constitution

If you believe the age of the United States should be counted from when the constitution, then the age of the United States is 233-years-old.

READ MORE: The Great Compromise of 1787

The Constitution was finally ratified by the ninth state (New Hampshire – holding everyone back…) on 21 June 1788 and came into force 1789. In its 7 articles, it embodies the doctrine of the separation of powers, the concepts of federalism, and the process of ratification. It’s been amended 27 times to help a growing nation accommodate the changing needs of an ever-expanding population.

Birthday 9. The End of the Civil War (156 years old)

end of the civil war

If you believe the age of the United States should be counted from the end of the Civil War, then the United States is only 156 years old!

During the Civil War, the Union ceased to exist as the southern states seceded. It wasn’t reformed until the end of the Civil War in June 1865.

I mean, if you get divorced and remarried, you don’t count your wedding anniversary from when you were first married, do you? So why would you do that with a country?

Birthday 10. The First McDonalds (66 years old)

How Old Is the United States of America? 5

If we’re going to play fun hypotheticals, then lets at least have some fun with it.

One of the significant contributions the United States has made to world culture is the invention of fast food (you can argue about its merits, but you can’t deny its impact). Of all the fast-food chains, the most iconic is MacDonalds.

A new restaurant opens every 14.5 hours and the company feeds 68 million people PER DAY – which is larger than the population of Great Britain, France, and South Africa, and more than double the population of Australia.

Given the significant role this American icon has played in shaping the culinary habits of the world, an argument could be made (not a good argument, but an argument nonetheless) that you should count America’s age from the opening of the first MacDonalds store.


Explore More US History Articles


If you believe the birth of the United States should be counted from when the Golden Arches first spanned this wide brown land and the first crunch of a McDonald’s french fry being hastily gobbled down by a satisfied customer was rang out across the carpark, then the United States is 66 years old as the first McDonalds opened it’s doors on April 15, 1955, in San Bernadino, California and has continued its march forward ever since.

In Summary

The age of the United States can be measured in many different ways, but the generally accepted consensus is that the United States of America is 245-years-old (and counting).

How to Cite this Article

There are three different ways you can cite this article.

1. To cite this article in an academic-style article or paper, use:

James Hardy, "How Old Is the United States of America?", History Cooperative, August 26, 2019, https://historycooperative.org/how-old-is-the-united-states-of-america/. Accessed November 24, 2021

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Источник: https://historycooperative.org/how-old-is-the-united-states-of-america/

Mapped: The world’s oldest democracies

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Which country today is the world’s oldest democracy?

It’s a loaded question ⁠— as you’ll see, there is plenty of nuance involved in the answer.

Depending on how you define things, there are many jurisdictions that can lay claim to this coveted title. Let’s dive into some of these technicalities, and then we can provide context for how we’ve defined democracy in today’s particular chart.

If you’re looking for the very first instance of democracy, credit is often attributed to Ancient Athens. It’s there the term originated, based on the Greek words demos (“common people”) and kratos (“strength”). In the 6th century BC, the city-state allowed all landowners to speak at the legislative assembly, blazing a path that would be followed by democracies in the future.

However, Ancient Athens wasn’t really a country in the modern sense. It’s also not around anymore, so that certainly disqualifies the oldest continuous democratic country today.

Iceland and the Isle of Man both have interesting claims to democracy. Each has a parliamentary body that is over 1,000 years old, making them the longest standing democratic institutions in the world. But Iceland only got its independence in 1944 from Denmark — and while it is self-governing, the Isle of Man is not a country.

Of course, when we’re talking about democracy today, we’re really talking about universal suffrage. New Zealand may have the best claim here — by 1893, the self-governing colony allowed all women and ethnicities to vote in elections.

While many civilizations, institutions, and societies have a rightful claim to contributing to democracy (including many we did not mention above), measuring the world’s oldest democracies today requires following a common set of criteria.

In today’s chart, we used data from Boix, C., Miller, M., & Rosato, S. (2013, 2018), which looks at the age of democratic regimes for 219 countries since the year 1800. Countries are classified as democracies if they meet the following conditions:

  • Executive:
    The executive is directly or indirectly elected in popular elections and is responsible either directly to voters or to a legislature.
  • Legislature:
    The legislature (or the executive if elected directly) is chosen in free and fair elections.
  • Voting:
    A majority of adult men has the right to vote.

Democracies also have to be continuous in order to count. Although France has important democratic origins, the country is currently on its fifth republic since the French Revolution, thanks to Napoleon, Vichy France, and other instances where things went sideways.

While the above criteria isn’t perfect, it does create a stable playing field to assess when countries adopted democratic systems in principle. (However, the exclusion of certain populations, notably women and specific ethnicities, in being given the right to vote, or to be elected to legislative assemblies, is another story).

The Oldest Democracies, by Number of Years

Using the above criteria, here is a list of the world’s 10 oldest democracies:

Using this specific criteria, there is only one country with continuous democracy for more than 200 years (The United States), and fourteen countries with democracies older than a century.

As you’ll notice in the data, many countries became democracies after World War II. The Japanese Empire, for example, was occupied by Allied Forces and then dissolved. It then regained sovereignty afterwards, emerging as a newly democratic regime.

Final notes: The data here goes back to 1800, and we have adjusted it to be current as of 2019. One change we made was to Tunisia, which is listed as the 24th oldest democracy in the data. Based on our due diligence on the subject, we felt it was appropriate to leave it off the list, given that most experts see the country as only achieving the status in 2014 in the post-Arab Spring era.

License and Republishing

World Economic Forum Type may be republished in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International Public License, and in accordance with our Terms of Use.

This article is published in collaboration with Visual Capitalist.

The views expressed in this article are those of the author alone and not the World Economic Forum.

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Источник: https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2019/08/countries-are-the-worlds-oldest-democracies
aerialviewdc

New York City was the first capital of the United States once the Constitution was ratified. George Washington took the oath of office to become the first President of the United States from the balcony of the old City Hall.

One of the issues the President had to deal with was a permanent location for the country’s seat of government. As part of a compromise, it was decided that the capital would move to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1791 for ten years and then to a suitable permanent location on the Potomac River. Washington chose an area that included land from the states of Maryland and Virginia. At this time the area was primarily farm and marsh lands. Congress was scheduled to meet in the new capital on the first Monday in December 1800.

Pierre Charles L’Enfant was hired to design the "Federal City." On June 11, 1800, the capital of the United States had a permanent home in Washington, D.C.

See also:
About the USA > Travel & Geography > The States & Territories > Washington D. C.

Источник: https://usa.usembassy.de/government-capital.htm
  • Between 1777 and 1960 Congress passed several acts that changed the shape, design and arrangement of the flag and allowed stars and stripes to be added to reflect the admission of each new state.
  • Today the flag consists of 13 horizontal stripes, seven red alternating with six white. The stripes represent the original 13 Colonies and the stars represent the 50 states of the Union. The colors of the flag are symbolic as well; red symbolizes hardiness and valor, white symbolizes purity and innocence, and blue represents vigilance, perseverance and justice.
  • The National Museum of American History has undertaken a long-term preservation project of the enormous 1814 garrison flag that survived the 25-hour shelling of Fort McHenry in Baltimore by British troops and inspired Francis Scott Key to compose “The Star-Spangled Banner.” Often referred to by that name, the flag had become soiled and weakened over time and was removed from the museum in December 1998. This preservation effort began in earnest in June 1999, and continues to this day. The flag is now stored at a 10-degree angle in a special low-oxygen, filtered light chamber and is periodically examined at a microscopic level to detect signs of decay or damage within its individual fibers.
  • There are a few locations where the U.S. flag is flown 24 hours a day, by either presidential proclamation or by law:

               – Fort McHenry, National Monument and Historic Shrine, Baltimore, Maryland

               – Flag House Square, Baltimore, Maryland

               – United States Marine Corps Memorial (Iwo Jima), Arlington, Virginia

               – On the Green of the Town of Lexington, Massachusetts

               – The White House, Washington, D.C.

               – United States customs ports of entry

               – Grounds of the National Memorial Arch in Valley Forge State Park, Valley Forge, Pennsylvania

Источник: https://www.pbs.org/a-capitol-fourth

The Stars and Stripes: Here are the 27 different US flags and their histories


John Harrington    24/7 Wall Street

The flag of the United States goes by different names – The Stars and Stripes; The Red, White, and Blue; Old Glory; and The Star-Spangled Banner. Regardless of what it is called, the American flag is one of the most recognizable symbols of any country in the world, and the inspiration for our national anthem.

The first official national flag was approved by the Continental Congress on June 14, 1777. The resolution read:  “Resolved, that the flag of the United States be thirteen stripes, alternate red and white; that the union be thirteen stars, white in a blue field representing a new constellation.” Each star represented a state and each stripe represented the 13 colonies that declared independence from Great Britain. The colors of the flag were inherited from British flags and have no official meaning. 

Since the founding of the United States in 1776, there have been 27 different versions of the flag featuring the stars and stripes. Each new flag represented the addition of one or more states as the United States grew westward to fulfill what it believed to be its manifest destiny of expansion in North America.

Fourth of July: Fireworks sales to top $1.3 billion for this year

As Independence Day nears, 24/7 Wall St. is taking a look at how each of these 27 flags got that way. We reviewed sites such as usflagdepot.com and various history websites to find out how each state was added to the Union, thus affixing a new star to the flag.

Of the 27 versions of the United States flag, nine flew for only about a year, reflecting the rapid expansion of the nation. Though we have not had a new star since 1960 – Hawaii – we may not be done adding stars. American-owned. territories Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, might be considered for statehood.

1. Thirteen-Star U.S. Flag

• Years flown: 1777 ~ 1795

• Who was president: George Washington (1789-1797)

The 13-star flag officially became the U.S. flag on June 14, 1777, and the date is celebrated every year in the United States as Flag Day. Though there is no conclusive proof, Francis Hopkinson, a congressman from New Jersey and a signer of the Declaration of Independence, is credited with designing the flag. Each star and stripe represented a former British colony.

2. Fifteen-Star U.S. Flag

• Years flown: 1795 ~ 1818

• Who was president: George Washington (1789-1797), John Adams (1797-1801), Thomas Jefferson (1801-1809), James Madison (1809-1817), and James Monroe (1817-1825)

Two stripes and two stars were added to the flag when Vermont and Kentucky became the 14th and 15th states in 1791 and 1792, respectively. The 15-star flag would last for 23 years and five presidents would serve under it. This flag inspired Francis Scott Key to write "The Star Spangled Banner," our national anthem, after Key saw the flag continue to fly over Fort McHenry following a British bombardment during the War of 1812.

3. Twenty-Star U.S. Flag

• Years flown: 1818 ~ 1819

• Who was president: James Monroe (1817-1825)

With the westward expansion of the United States and the addition of more states, Congress realized that adding stripes to the flag would be impractical. So Congress passed the Flag Act in 1818, restoring the original 13-stripe design and unveiling the flag with additional stars on July 4. Five stars were added to represent five new states: Tennessee (1796), Ohio (1803), Louisiana (1812), Indiana (1816), and Mississippi (1817). The 20-star flag became the official flag on April 13, 1818, and it was the first of nine flags to only last about a year.

4. Twenty-One Star U.S. Flag

• Years flown: 1819 ~ 1820

• Who was president: James Monroe (1817-1825)

Just over a year after the twenty-star flag was introduced, the United States added Illinois to the Union, boosting the number of states to 21. Illinois, where future president Abraham Lincoln began his political career, was admitted on Dec. 3, 1818.

5. Twenty-Three Star U.S. Flag

• Years flown: 1820 ~ 1822

• Who was president: James Monroe (1817-1825)

The number of U.S. states rose to 23 with the admission of Alabama in 1819 and Maine in 1820. The flag became the official U.S. flag on July 4, 1820, and would last two years. President James Monroe was the only president to serve under this flag as well as the previous two flags.

6. Twenty-Four Star U.S. Flag

• Years flown: 1822 ~ 1836

• Who was president: James Monroe (1817-1825), John Quincy Adams (1825-1829), and Andrew Jackson (1829-1837)

The flag expanded to 24 stars with the addition of Missouri in 1821. Missouri, a slave state, was admitted as part of the Missouri Compromise, which sought to achieve a balance of free and slave states during the antebellum period. The compromise included the admission of Maine, a free state, which had separated from Massachusetts and become a state the previous year.

7. Twenty-Five Star U.S. Flag

• Years flown: 1836 ~ 1837

• Who was president: Andrew Jackson (1829-1837) and Martin Van Buren (1837-1841)

Arkansas joined the Union as a slave state on June 15, 1836. Less than a month later, its star was included in the U.S. flag, pushing the state total to 25. Arkansas was part of the Louisiana Purchase and carved out of what became the Missouri Territory to become its own territory.

8. Twenty-Six Star U.S. Flag

• Years flown: 1837 ~ 1845

• Who was president: Martin Van Buren (1837-1841), William Henry Harrison (1841), John Tyler (1841-1845), and James Polk (1845-1849)

Michigan was admitted to the Union in 1837 as a free state to help maintain the balance between slave and free states. Michigan's admission had been thwarted because of a border dispute with Ohio – which had been admitted as a state in 1803 – but President Andrew Jackson helped Michigan save face by awarding it land from the Upper Peninsula, and then it was granted statehood, boosting the number of states to 26.

9. Twenty-Seven Star U.S. Flag

• Years flown: 1845 ~ 1846

• Who was president: James Polk (1845-1849)

Florida, a former possession of the Spanish empire, was admitted to the Union in 1845, raising the total number of U.S. states to 27. It would not remain in the Union for long: Florida would secede in 1861.

10. Twenty-Eight Star U.S. Flag

• Years flown: 1846 ~ 1847

• Who was president: James Polk (1845-1849)

In 1846, the flag would undergo another change, this time because of the admission of Texas. Before becoming the 28th state, the Lone Star state had broken away from Mexico in 1836. It was an independent republic before joining the Union and becoming the biggest state in land mass in the contiguous 48 states.

11. Twenty-Nine Star U.S. Flag

• Years flown: 1847 ~ 1848

• Who was president: James Polk (1845-1849)

Iowa was admitted to the Union on Dec. 28, 1846, as a free state to maintain the balance between free and slave states during the antebellum period. Its star was added to the U.S. flag the following July 4. Originally part of the Louisiana Purchase, Iowa grew dramatically because of its rich farmland. Iowa had been established as a U.S. territory in 1838.

12. Thirty-Star U.S. Flag

• Years flown: 1848 ~ 1851

• Who was president: James Polk (1845-1849), Zachary Taylor (1849-1850),and Millard Fillmore (1850-1853)

Wisconsin became a state on May 29, 1848, adding the 30th star to the U.S. flag less than two months later. Not all residents of Wisconsin were enthusiastic about statehood. They had rejected it four times previously because they were concerned statehood would mean higher taxes.

13. Thirty-One Star U.S. Flag

• Years flown: 1851 ~ 1858

• Who was president: Millard Fillmore (1850-1853), Franklin Pierce (1853-1857), and James Buchanan (1857-1861)

The Gold Rush that began with the discovery of the precious metal in 1848 helped fast-track California to statehood in 1850. California became the 31st star on the American flag the following July 4. The admission of California fulfilled America's manifest destiny of a nation extending from sea to sea.

14. Thirty-Two Star U.S. Flag

• Years flown: 1858 ~ 1859

• Who was president: James Buchanan (1857-1861)

On the eve of the Civil War, Minnesota was admitted to the Union on May 11, 1858, and represented as the 32nd state on the flag less than two months later. Minnesota was admitted as a free state.

15. Thirty-Three Star U.S. Flag

• Years flown: 1859 ~ 1861

• Who was president: James Buchanan (1857-1861) and Abraham Lincoln (1861-1865)

America's expansion surged to the Northwest with the admission of Oregon on Feb. 14, 1859, adding a 33rd star to the flag the following July. Oregon, which had become a U.S. territory in 1848, was admitted as a free state, though its first two senators, Joseph Lane and Delazon Smith, were proslavery Democrats.

16. Thirty-Four Star U.S. Flag

• Years flown: 1861 ~ 1863

• Who was president: Abraham Lincoln (1861-1865)

Kansas became the 34th state to join the Union. Voter fraud over whether the state would be admitted as a slave state or a free state delayed its admission. Kansas joined the Union on Jan. 29, 1861 as a free state, just as the southern states were seceding, and its star was represented on the flag six months later.

17. Thirty-Five Star U.S. Flag

• Years flown: 1863 ~ 1865

• Who was president: Abraham Lincoln (1861-1865) and Andrew Johnson (1865-1869)

The onset of the Civil War did not halt the admission of states to the Union. The western part of Virginia was pro-Union and contained many abolitionists. It split from the rest of the state, which had seceded. President Abraham Lincoln was unsure about dividing Virginia and admitting the western portion as a separate state. He agreed to its admission on the grounds that West Virginia's action was an act of secession in favor of the Constitution. West Virginia joined the Union on June 20, 1863, and a new flag on July 4 included the 35th state.

18. Thirty-Six Star U.S. Flag

• Years flown: 1865 ~ 1867

• Who was president: Andrew Johnson (1865-1869)

The Civil War was engulfing the nation when Nevada was admitted as the 36th state on Oct. 31, 1864, and the 36th star on the U.S. flag the following July. Nevada was pro-Union and President Abraham Lincoln saw Nevada's admission as a way to buttress support for the war. To speed up statehood, Nevada sent its entire state constitution to Washington, D.C. – 175 pages – by telegram.

19. Thirty-Seven Star U.S. Flag

• Years flown: 1867 ~ 1877

• Who was president: Andrew Johnson (1865-1869), Ulysses S. Grant (1869-1877), and Rutherford B. Hayes (1877-1881)

Nebraska was the first state to be admitted to the Union after the Civil War. After the Civil War, rapid economic development accelerated by the growth of railroads helped speed Nebraska's admission to the Union on March 1, 1867, becoming the nation's 37th state and the 37th star on the flag.

20. Thirty-Eight Star U.S. Flag

• Years flown: 1877 ~ 1890

• Who was president: Rutherford B. Hayes (1877-1881), James A. Garfield (1881), Chester A. Arthur (1881-1885), Grover Cleveland (1885-1889), and Benjamin Harrison (1889-1893)

Colorado, a territory that partially came with the Louisiana Purchase in 1803, became the 38th state to join the Union on Aug. 1, 1876. Colorado's admission had been vetoed by President Andrew Johnson, but President Ulysses S. Grant approved it. The 38-star flag would fly for 13 years.

21. Forty-Three Star U.S. Flag

• Years flown: 1890 ~ 1891

• Who was president: Benjamin Harrison (1889-1893)

A flurry of state admissions boosted the star total on the flag to 43 by July 4, 1890, as statehood filled out the United States in the high plains and the far west. Five states were admitted to the Union and five stars added to the flag: North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, and Washington all in 1889, and Idaho in 1890.

22. Forty-Four Star U.S. Flag

• Years flown: 1891 ~ 1896

• Who was president: Benjamin Harrison (1889-1893) and Grover Cleveland (1893-1897)

Six states were admitted to the Union when President Benjamin Harrison was president, more than any other president. Wyoming was the last of the six, boosting the number of stars on the flag to 44. Wyoming was admitted on July 10, 1890, even though it was 5,000-people short of the 60,000-person requirement to become a state.

23. Forty-Five Star U.S. Flag

• Years flown: 1896 ~ 1908

• Who was president: Grover Cleveland (1893-1897), William McKinley (1897-1901), and Theodore Roosevelt (1901-1909)

Utah became a state on Jan. 4, 1896, and the 45th star on the flag later that year. However, the area that would become Utah had been part of the United States since the nation received the territory as part of a treaty that ended the Mexican-American War in 1848. Mormons settled in the area, and their practice of polygamy prevented Utah from becoming a state until Mormons renounced polygamy in the state constitution.

24. Forty-Six Star U.S. Flag

• Years flown: 1908 ~ 1912

• Who was president: Theodore Roosevelt (1901-1909) and William H. Taft (1909-1913)

Oklahoma became the first state to be admitted to the Union in the 20th century, on Nov. 16, 1907, taking its place on the U.S. flag as the 46th star the following year. The United States had used the Oklahoma territory to resettle Native American people, but by the late 19th century, Texas ranchers began moving northward and the federal government decided to open up the territory for homesteaders.

25. Forty-Eight Star U.S. Flag

• Years flown: 1912 ~ 1959

• Who was president: William H. Taft (1909-1913), Woodrow Wilson (1913-1921), Warren Harding (1921-1923), Calvin Coolidge (1923-1929), Herbert Hoover (1929-1933), Franklin D. Roosevelt (1933-1945), Harry S.Truman (1945-1953), Dwight D. Eisenhower (1953-1961)

The southwestern territories of New Mexico and Arizona were the last to join the 48 contiguous states. New Mexico became the 47th state on Jan. 6, 1912, and Arizona attained statehood on Feb. 14, 1912. The 48-star flag flew longer than any other flag before it, 47 years, and eight presidents served under it.

26. Forty-Nine Star U.S. Flag

• Years flown: 1959 ~ 1960

• Who was president: President Eisenhower (1953-1961)

Alaska became the first non-contiguous territory to become a state on Jan. 3, 1959, and the 49th star on the U.S. flag. Alaska, which was purchased from Russia in 1867, is 2.5 times the size of Texas, the second-largest U.S. state. The 49-star flag was the last of the nine flags to fly for just one year.

27. Fifty-Star U.S. Flag

• Years flown: 1960 ~ present

• Who was president: Presidents Eisenhower (1953-1961), John F. Kennedy (1961-1963), Lyndon B. Johnson (1963-1969), Richard M. Nixon (1969-1974), Gerald R. Ford (1974-1977), Jimmy Carter (1977-1981), Ronald Reagan (1981-1989) George H.W. Bush (1989-1993), William Clinton (1993-2001), George W. Bush (2001-2009), Barack Obama (2009-2017), Donald Trump (2017-present)

Hawaii is the 50th state, and joined the Union on Aug. 21, 1959. The 50-star flag has flown the longest of any U.S. flag, and in July it will have flown for 59 years. Twelve presidents have served under this flag.

24/7 Wall Street is a USA TODAY content partner offering financial news and commentary. Its content is produced independently of USA TODAY.

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Источник: https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/2019/07/03/july-4th-the-histories-us-flags-for-independence-day/39637697/

American Isolationism in the 1930s

During the 1930s, the combination of the Great Depression and the memory of tragic losses in World War I contributed to pushing American public opinion and policy toward isolationism. Isolationists advocated non-involvement in European and Asian conflicts and non-entanglement in international politics. Although the United States took measures to avoid political and military conflicts across the oceans, it continued to expand economically and protect its interests in Latin America. The leaders of the isolationist movement drew upon history to bolster their position. In his Farewell Address, President George Washington had advocated non-involvement in European wars and politics. For much of the nineteenth century, the expanse of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans had made it possible for the United States to enjoy a kind of “free security” and remain largely detached from Old World conflicts. During World War I, however, President Woodrow Wilson made a case for U.S. intervention in the conflict and a U.S. interest in maintaining a peaceful world order. Nevertheless, the American experience in that war served to bolster the arguments of isolationists; they argued that marginal U.S. interests in that conflict did not justify the number of U.S. casualties.

President Woodrow Wilson

In the wake of the World War I, a report by Senator Gerald P. Nye, a Republican from North Dakota, fed this belief by claiming that American bankers and arms manufacturers had pushed for U.S. involvement for their own profit. The 1934 publication of the book Merchants of Death by H.C. Engelbrecht and F. C. Hanighen, followed by the 1935 tract “War Is a Racket” by decorated Marine Corps General Smedley D. Butler both served to increase popular suspicions of wartime profiteering and influence public opinion in the direction of neutrality. Many Americans became determined not to be tricked by banks and industries into making such great sacrifices again. The reality of a worldwide economic depression and the need for increased attention to domestic problems only served to bolster the idea that the United States should isolate itself from troubling events in Europe. During the interwar period, the U.S. Government repeatedly chose non-entanglement over participation or intervention as the appropriate response to international questions. Immediately following the First World War, Congress rejected U.S. membership in the League of Nations. Some members of Congress opposed membership in the League out of concern that it would draw the United States into European conflicts, although ultimately the collective security clause sank the possibility of U.S. participation. During the 1930s, the League proved ineffectual in the face of growing militarism, partly due to the U.S. decision not to participate.

Senator Gerald Nye

The Japanese invasion of Manchuria and subsequent push to gain control over larger expanses of Northeast China in 1931 led President Herbert Hoover and his Secretary of State, Henry Stimson, to establish the Stimson Doctrine, which stated that the United States would not recognize the territory gained by aggression and in violation of international agreements. With the Stimson Doctrine, the United States expressed concern over the aggressive action without committing itself to any direct involvement or intervention. Other conflicts, including the Italian invasion of Ethiopia and the Spanish Civil War, also resulted in virtually no official commitment or action from the United States Government. Upon taking office, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt tended to see a necessity for the United States to participate more actively in international affairs, but his ability to apply his personal outlook to foreign policy was limited by the strength of isolationist sentiment in the U.S. Congress. In 1933, President Roosevelt proposed a Congressional measure that would have granted him the right to consult with other nations to place pressure on aggressors in international conflicts. The bill ran into strong opposition from the leading isolationists in Congress, including progressive politicians such as Senators Hiram Johnson of California, William Borah of Idaho, and Robert La Follette of Wisconsin. In 1935, controversy over U.S. participation in the World Court elicited similar opposition. As tensions rose in Europe over Nazi Germany’s aggressive maneuvers, Congress pushed through a series of Neutrality Acts, which served to prevent American ships and citizens from becoming entangled in outside conflicts. Roosevelt lamented the restrictive nature of the acts, but because he still required Congressional support for his domestic New Deal policies, he reluctantly acquiesced.

The isolationists were a diverse group, including progressives and conservatives, business owners and peace activists, but because they faced no consistent, organized opposition from internationalists, their ideology triumphed time and again. Roosevelt appeared to accept the strength of the isolationist elements in Congress until 1937. In that year, as the situation in Europe continued to grow worse and the Second Sino-Japanese War began in Asia, the President gave a speech in which he likened international aggression to a disease that other nations must work to “quarantine.” At that time, however, Americans were still not prepared to risk their lives and livelihoods for peace abroad. Even the outbreak of war in Europe in 1939 did not suddenly diffuse popular desire to avoid international entanglements. Instead, public opinion shifted from favoring complete neutrality to supporting limited U.S. aid to the Allies short of actual intervention in the war. The surprise Japanese attack on the U.S. Navy at Pearl Harbor in December of 1941 served to convince the majority of Americans that the United States should enter the war on the side of the Allies.

Источник: https://history.state.gov/milestones/1937-1945/american-isolationism

Representatives from the 13 colonies convened the First Continental Congress in Philadelphia in 1774. The following year the Second Continental Congress met at Philadelphia's State-House. Baltimore; Lancaster, Pennsylvania; York, Pennsylvania; and College Hall in Philadelphia were also meeting sites for the Second Continental Congress.

Under td bank hours nyc Articles of Confederation, from 1781 to 1788, Congress convened in Philadelphia; Princeton, New Jersey; Annapolis, Maryland; Trenton, New Jersey; and New York.  Since the U.S. Congress was established by the Constitution in 1789, it has convened in three locations:  New York, Philadelphia, and its permanent home in Washington, D.C.

Nine Capitals details why the Continental Congress, Congress under the Articles of Confederation, and the U.S. Congress moved from place to place until a permanent capital was established in Washington, D.C.   Each chapter gives historical information on the events surrounding the move to the city, what business occurred there, and why the government moved on. Robert Fortenbaugh provides a rare analysis describing the little-known fact that there were nine capitals of the United States.

In November 2000, the U.S. Congress commemorated two centuries of residence in Washington, D.C. Learn more about the numerous chambers the Senate and House of Representatives have occupied in Washington.

First Continental Congress

September 5, 1774 to October 24, 1774:
    Philadelphia, Carpenter’s Hall

Second Continental Congress

May 10, 1775 to December 12, 1776:
   Philadelphia, State House

December 20, 1776 to Old basketball cards worth money 27, 1777:
    Baltimore, Henry Fite’s House

March 4, 1777 to September 18, 1777:
    Philadelphia, State House

September 27, 1777 (one day):
   Lancaster, Pennsylvania, Court House

September 30, 1777 to June 27, 1778:
   York, Pennsylvania, Court House

July 2, 1778 to March 1, 1781:
    Philadelphia, College Hall, then State House

Congress under the Articles of Confederation

March 1, 1781 to June 21, 1783:
   Philadelphia, State House

June 30, 1783 to November 4, 1783:
   Princeton, New Jersey, “Prospect,” then Nassau Hall

November 26, 1783 to August 19, 1784:
   Annapolis, Maryland, State House

November 1, 1784 to December 24, 1784:
    Trenton, New Jersey, French Arms Tavern

January 11, 1785 to Autumn 1788:
    New York, City Hall, then Fraunce's Tavern

Congress under the Constitution

March 4, 1789 to August 12, 1790:
    New York, Federal Hall

December 6, 1790 to May 14, 1800:
    Philadelphia, Philadelphia County Building–Congress Hall

November 17, 1800:
    Washington, U.S. Capitol

Источник: https://www.senate.gov/reference/reference_item/Nine_Capitals_of_the_United_States.htm
  • Between 1777 and 1960 Congress passed several acts that changed the shape, design and arrangement of the flag and allowed stars and stripes to be added to reflect the admission of each new state.
  • Today the flag consists of 13 horizontal stripes, seven red alternating with six white. The stripes represent the original 13 Colonies and the stars represent the 50 states of the Union. The colors of the flag are symbolic as well; red symbolizes hardiness and valor, white symbolizes purity and innocence, and blue represents vigilance, perseverance and justice.
  • The National Museum of American History has undertaken a long-term preservation project of the enormous 1814 garrison flag that survived the 25-hour shelling of Fort McHenry in Baltimore by British troops and inspired Francis Scott Key to compose “The Star-Spangled Banner.” Often referred to by that name, the flag had become soiled and weakened over time and was removed from the museum in December 1998. This preservation effort began in earnest in June 1999, and continues to this day. The flag is now stored at a 10-degree angle in a special low-oxygen, filtered light chamber and is periodically examined at a microscopic level to detect signs of decay or damage within its individual fibers.
  • There are a few locations where the U.S. flag is flown 24 hours a day, by either presidential proclamation or by law:

               – Fort McHenry, Huntington bank login auto loan Monument and Historic Shrine, Baltimore, Maryland

               – Flag House Square, Baltimore, Maryland

               – United States Marine Corps Memorial (Iwo Jima), Arlington, Virginia

               – On the Green of the Town of Lexington, Massachusetts

               – The White House, Washington, D.C.

               – United States customs ports of entry

               – Grounds of the National Memorial Arch in Valley Forge State Park, Valley Forge, Pennsylvania

Источник: https://www.pbs.org/a-capitol-fourth

American Isolationism in the 1930s

During the 1930s, the combination of the Great Depression and the memory of tragic losses in World War I contributed to pushing American public opinion and policy toward isolationism. Isolationists advocated non-involvement in European and Asian conflicts and non-entanglement in international politics. Although the United States took measures to avoid political and military conflicts across the oceans, it continued to expand economically and protect its interests in Latin how old is the united states of america America. The leaders of the isolationist movement drew upon history to bolster their position. In his Farewell Address, President George Washington had advocated non-involvement in European wars and politics. For much of the nineteenth century, the expanse of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans had made it possible for the United States to enjoy a kind of “free security” and remain largely detached from Old World conflicts. During World War I, however, President Woodrow Wilson made a case for U.S. intervention in the conflict and a U.S. interest in maintaining a capital one bank north las vegas peaceful world order. Nevertheless, the American experience in that war served to bolster the arguments of isolationists; they argued that marginal U.S. interests in that conflict did not justify the number of U.S. casualties.

President Woodrow Wilson

In the wake of the World War I, a report by Senator Gerald P. Nye, a Republican from North Dakota, fed this belief by claiming that American bankers and arms manufacturers had pushed for U.S. involvement for their own profit. The 1934 publication of the book Merchants of Death by H.C. How old is the united states of america and F. C. Hanighen, followed by the 1935 tract “War Is a Racket” by decorated Marine Corps General Smedley D. Butler both served to increase popular suspicions of wartime profiteering and influence public opinion in the direction of neutrality. Many Americans became determined not to be tricked by banks and industries into making such great sacrifices again. The reality of a worldwide economic depression and the need for increased attention to domestic problems only served to bolster the idea that the United States should isolate itself from troubling events in Europe. During the interwar period, the U.S. Government repeatedly chose non-entanglement over participation or intervention as the appropriate response to international questions. Immediately following the First World War, Congress rejected U.S. membership in the League of Nations. Some members of Congress opposed membership in the Regions bank customer service hours out of concern that it would draw the United States into European conflicts, although ultimately the collective security clause sank the possibility of U.S. participation. During the 1930s, the League proved ineffectual in the face of growing militarism, partly due to the U.S. decision not to participate.

Senator Gerald Nye

The Japanese invasion of Manchuria and subsequent push to gain control over larger expanses of Northeast China in 1931 led President Herbert Hoover and his Secretary of State, Henry Stimson, to establish the Stimson Doctrine, which stated that the United States would not recognize the territory gained by aggression and in violation of international agreements. With the Stimson Doctrine, the United States expressed concern over the aggressive action without how old is the united states of america committing itself to any direct involvement or intervention. Other conflicts, including the Italian invasion of Ethiopia and the Spanish Civil War, also resulted in virtually no official commitment or action from the United States Government. Upon taking office, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt tended to chase bank branch number a necessity for the United States to participate more actively in international affairs, but his ability to apply his personal outlook to foreign free business checking account nyc policy was limited by the strength of isolationist sentiment in the U.S. Congress. In 1933, President Roosevelt proposed a Congressional measure that would have granted him the right to consult with other nations to place pressure on aggressors in international conflicts. The bill ran into strong opposition from the leading isolationists in Congress, including progressive politicians such as Senators Hiram Johnson of California, William Borah of Idaho, and Robert La Follette of Wisconsin. In 1935, controversy over U.S. participation in the World Court elicited similar opposition. As tensions rose in Europe over Nazi how old is the united states of america Germany’s aggressive maneuvers, How old is the united states of america pushed through a series of Neutrality Acts, which what is the routing number for united community bank served to prevent American ships and citizens from becoming entangled in outside conflicts. Roosevelt lamented the restrictive nature of the acts, but because he still required Congressional support for his domestic New Deal policies, he reluctantly acquiesced.

The isolationists were a diverse group, including progressives and conservatives, business owners and peace activists, but because they faced no consistent, organized opposition from internationalists, their ideology triumphed time and again. Roosevelt appeared to accept the strength of the isolationist elements in Congress until 1937. In that year, as the situation in Europe continued to grow worse and the Second Sino-Japanese War began in Asia, the President gave a how old is the united states of america speech in which he likened international aggression to a disease that other nations must work to “quarantine.” At that time, however, Americans were still how old is the united states of america not prepared to risk their lives and livelihoods for peace abroad. Even the outbreak of war in Europe in 1939 did not suddenly diffuse popular desire to avoid how old is the united states of america entanglements. Instead, public opinion shifted from favoring capital one mastercard login uk complete neutrality to supporting limited U.S. aid to the Allies short of actual intervention in the war. The surprise Japanese attack on the U.S. Navy at ally financial physical overnight payoff address Pearl Harbor in December of 1941 served to convince the majority of Americans that the United States should enter the war on the how old is the united states of america side of the Allies.

Источник: https://history.state.gov/milestones/1937-1945/american-isolationism

The question “How old is America?” is both a simple and complex question to answer, depending on how you want to measure age.

We’re going to start with the simple and then move onto the complex.

How Old Is America? – the Simple Answer

Constitution

The simple answer is that as of the 4th of July 2021, the United States is 245 years old. It’s 245-years-old because the Declaration of Independence was ratified by the US Second Continental Congress on July 4, 1776.

The passing of the Declaration of Independence meant that the thirteen original British colonies in North America ceased to be colonies and officially (at least according to them) became a sovereign nation.

READ MORE:Colonial America

But, as I said before, this is just the simple answer and the simple answer may or may not be correct depending on when you count the birth of a nation.

Here are 9 other potential birth dates and ages for the United States of America.


Recommended Reading


Birthday 2. The Formation of a Continent (200 million years old)

The North American Continent

If you believe the age of the United States should be counted from when the North American landmass first separated from the rest of the surrounding world, the US would be celebrating it’s 200 millionth birthday!

Good luck trying to find a Hallmark card for that one… 🙂

It separated from a landmass known as Laurentia (Lauren, to her friends) which also contained Eurasia, around 200 million years ago.

Birthday 3. The Arrival of the Native Americans (15,000-40,000 years old)

alaska airlines credit card bank of america login height="453" src="https://HiCoop.b-cdn.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/1024px-Tableau_31_Indians_hunting_the_bison_by_Karl_Bodmer-1.jpg" alt="The arrival of Native Americans">

If you believe the age of the United States should be counted from when the Native Americans first set foot on the North American continent, then the age of the United States is somewhere between 15,000 and 40,000-years-old.

It’s believed the first Native Americans arrived between 13,000 B.C.E and 38,000 B.C.E via a land bridge connecting North America to Siberia. Hallmark still isn’t coming to the party on this one, but I’d LOVE to see a birthday cake stacked with 13,000+ candles!

Birthday 4. The Arrival of Christopher Columbus (528 years old)

Arrival of Christopher Columbus

If you believe the age of the United States should be counted from when Christopher Columbus ‘discovered’ America, landing on the ‘uninhabited’ (if you don’t count the somewhere between 8 million and 112 million Native Americans) shores of North America, then the United States is 528 years old.

He set sail on the evening of August 3, 1492, in three ships: the Nina, the Pinta, and the Santa Maria. It took roughly 10 weeks to find the Americas, and on October 12, 1492, he set foot in the Bahamas with a group of sailors from the Santa Maria.

However, given the ugly events of the next few years surrounding European colonization in the Americas, celebrating this date as America’s birthday has fallen largely out of favor. In fact, in many places in the United States, people have stopped celebrating the anniversary of Columbus’ arrival to the America’s because of a better understanding of the impact this had on indigenous populations.

Birthday 5. The First Settlement (434 years old)

Roanoke Island

If you believe the age of the United States should be counted from when the first settlement was established, then the United States is 434 years old.

The first settlement was established on Roanoke Island in 1587, however, all was not well. The harsh conditions and lack of supplies meant that by the time some of the original settlers arrived back on the island with supplies in 1590, the settlement appeared to be completely abandoned with no sign of the original inhabitants.

Birthday 6. The First SUCCESSFUL Settlement (412 years old)

Jamestown

If you believe the age of the United States should be counted from when the first successful settlement was established, then the age of the United States is 412 years old.

The failure of Roanoke Island didn’t deter the British. In a joint venture with the Virginia Company, they established a second settlement at Jamestown in 1609. Once again, the harsh conditions, aggressive natives, and lack of supplies made life on the continental US very tough (they even resorted to cannibalism to survive at one point), but the settlement was ultimately successful.

Birthday 7. The Articles of Confederation (240 years old)

How Old Is the United States of America? 4

If you believe the age of the United States should be counted from the Articles of Confederation were ratified, then the United States is 240-years-old.

The Articles of Confederation laid the framework for how the states were to operate in their ‘League of Friendship’ (their words, not mine) and were the guiding principles behind the decision-making process of Congress.

The articles were debated for more than a year (July 1776 – November 1777) before being sent to the states for ratification on November 15th. They were finally ratified and came into force on March 1st, 1781.

Birthday 8. The Ratification of the Constitution (233 years old)

Signing of the US constitution

If you believe the age of the United States should be counted from when the constitution, then the age of the United States is 233-years-old.

READ MORE: The Great Compromise of 1787

The Constitution was finally ratified by the ninth state (New Hampshire – holding everyone back…) on 21 June 1788 and came into force 1789. In its 7 articles, it embodies the doctrine of the separation of powers, the concepts of federalism, and the process of ratification. It’s been amended 27 times to help a growing nation accommodate the changing needs of an ever-expanding population.

Birthday 9. The End of the Civil War (156 years old)

end of the civil war

If you believe the age of the United States should be counted from the end of the Civil War, then the United States is only 156 years old!

During the Civil War, the Union ceased to exist as the southern states seceded. It wasn’t reformed until the end of the Civil War in June 1865.

I mean, if you get divorced and remarried, you don’t count your wedding anniversary from when you were first married, do you? So why would you do that with a country?

Birthday 10. The First McDonalds (66 years old)

How Old Is the United States of America? 5

If we’re going to play fun hypotheticals, then lets at least have some fun with it.

One of the significant contributions the United States has made to world culture is the invention of fast food (you can argue about its merits, but you can’t deny its impact). Of all the fast-food chains, the most iconic is MacDonalds.

A new restaurant opens every 14.5 hours and the company feeds 68 million people PER DAY – which is larger than the population of Great Britain, France, and South Africa, and more than double the population of Australia.

Given the significant role this American icon has played in shaping the culinary habits of the world, an argument could be made (not a good argument, but an argument nonetheless) that you should count America’s age from the opening of the first MacDonalds store.


Explore More US History Articles


If you believe the birth of the United States should be counted from when the Golden Arches first spanned this wide brown land and the first crunch of a McDonald’s french fry being hastily gobbled down by a satisfied customer was rang out across m night shyamalan new movie 2016 carpark, then the United States is 66 years old as the first McDonalds opened it’s doors on April 15, 1955, in San Bernadino, California and has continued its march forward ever since.

In Summary

The age of the United States can be measured in many different ways, but the generally accepted consensus is that the United States of America is 245-years-old (and counting).

How to Cite this Article

There are three different ways you can cite this article.

1. To cite this article in an academic-style article or paper, use:

James Hardy, "How Old Is the United States of America?", History Cooperative, August 26, 2019, https://historycooperative.org/how-old-is-the-united-states-of-america/. Accessed November 24, 2021

2. To link to this article in the text of an online publication, please use this URL:

https://historycooperative.org/how-old-is-the-united-states-of-america/

3. If your web page requires an HTML link, please insert this code:

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Источник: https://historycooperative.org/how-old-is-the-united-states-of-america/

The Stars and Stripes: Here are the 27 different US flags and their histories


John How old is the united states of america

aerialviewdc

New York City was the first capital of the United States once the Constitution was ratified. George Washington took the oath of office to become the first President of the United States from the balcony of the old City Hall.

One of the issues the President had to deal with was a permanent location for the country’s seat of government. As part of a compromise, it was decided that the capital would move to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1791 for ten years and then to a suitable permanent location on the Potomac River. Washington chose an area that included land from the states of Maryland and Virginia. At this time the area was primarily farm and marsh lands. Congress was scheduled to meet in the new capital on the first Monday in December 1800.

Pierre Charles L’Enfant was hired to design the "Federal City." On June 11, 1800, the capital of the United States had a permanent home in Washington, D.C.

See also:
About the USA > Travel & Geography > The States & Territories > Washington D. C.

Источник: https://usa.usembassy.de/government-capital.htm

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