Are there any home remedies for uti


are there any home remedies for uti

There are no proven home remedies for preventing or treating UTIs. However, there is promising research for the use of cranberries, D-mannose. Are there any natural remedies for UTI treatment? Many people are curious about whether foods and supplements can help treat a UTI at home. Some complementary and alternative (CAM) therapies may be helpful for UTIs, but they may not be right for every person. Natural medicines and supplements.

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Are there any home remedies for uti -

Did you know that cats have a low thirst drive? In the past, felines had a majority of their hydration needs met from the prey they ate rather than stopping to drink from water sources where they’d be open to attack. Because of this, cats are susceptible to a variety of urinary health concerns such as urinary tract disease and UTIs.

If your cat gets a UTI, there’s no need to panic. We’ve compiled 13 natural remedies for your cat’s UTI that you can try at home, as well as the common symptoms of a UTI to help you diagnose it. These solutions can help to relieve the discomfort associated with a UTI and reduce or eliminate the infection. But sometimes, the case is serious enough to warrant a trip to the vet, so we’ve also included the signs you should look out for.

Symptoms of a UTI in Cats

So, how do you know when your cat has a UTI? There are quite a few urinary problems that cats can develop, so it’s important to be sure that your cat has a UTI before you start treating it.

Other problems like lower urinary tract disease and bladder stones can sometimes have serious consequences and can even become life-threatening. These conditions may require professional help, but a simple UTI can often be effectively managed with home remedies.

If you see your cat straining to urinate or attempting to urinate but failing, then it’s likely caused by a UTI. Likewise, if your cat is crying or whining when they urinate and grooming excessively afterward, then it’s probably a UTI. Bloody urine is also a sign of a UTI.

While cats will always make use of the litter box under normal circumstances, they’ll often urinate outside the litter box if they have a UTI. They might also become very lethargic or develop a fever or even a sore back.

If you observe one or more of these symptoms in your cat, then they likely have a UTI and you can start administering a natural home remedy to help relieve the issue.

13 Natural Home Remedies For Cat UTIs

Once you’ve determined that your cat’s symptoms are congruent with a UTI, it’s time to start treating the issue with one of the following 13 natural home remedies. You can start anywhere you like and even combine these solutions to help heal your cat quickly.

1. Drink More Water

Dehydration can help to cause or exacerbate urinary tract problems like infections. When your cat isn’t getting enough water, the bacteria in their urinary tract have a chance to grow and multiply. These bacteria can often cause UTIs or even worse.

While drinking more water isn’t going to eliminate a UTI on its own, it will definitely help to reduce the symptoms, aid other cures in eradicating the UTI, and will also help to prevent more UTIs from occurring in the future. Ensure that your cat always has plenty of water and that it’s in an easily accessible place where they can always reach it.

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2. Glucosamine and Chondroitin

Glucosamine and chondroitin are two supplements that are commonly given to cats to ensure their joints remain healthy and supple as the cat ages. But as it turns out, these useful supplements can also help with FLUTD, feline lower urinary tract disease. This is different than a UTI, though repetitive UTIs can cause FLUTD.

But UTIs and FLUTD have very common symptoms and they can both be painful for the cat. Glucosamine has anti-inflammatory properties and can help to protect the bladder’s lining, especially when paired with chondroitin. This can help to reduce the level of discomfort your cat is experiencing while also allowing the UTI to heal faster.

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3. Juniper Berry

Juniper berry is an herb that helps the kidneys to effectively filter out impurities at a higher rate. This can, in turn, increase urine production, helping to flush your cat’s system out and expel the harmful bacteria that are infecting the urinary tract.

This herb has also been shown to work well at reducing inflammation, which can help to alleviate your cat’s suffering and reduce the pain they’re experiencing from the UTI. What’s more, juniper berry can also kill bacteria and fungi that are antibiotic-resistant, helping to completely kill any UTI your cat may be experiencing.

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4. Apple Cider Vinegar

Apple cider vinegar is an all-natural cure for several ailments that cats commonly suffer, including UTIs. But it can be harmful in heavy doses, so be sure to keep the dosage to a minimum.

Because apple cider is so acidic, it can help to prevent bacteria from growing in your cat’s urinary tract. This can help to reduce and eliminate any UTIs your cat is currently suffering from.

You’ll want to dilute the apple cider vinegar with water before giving it to your cat; never give them the apple cider vinegar straight.

For smaller cats under four pounds, a few drops added to their water each day will suffice. Larger cats that are over six pounds can have up to half a teaspoon each day. Medium-sized cats that fall between four and six pounds should be given 1/4-teaspoon each day.

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5. Echinacea

Echinacea is widely used to treat multiple types of infections in humans, including yeast infections and UTIs. But it can be just as helpful for your cat. It’s commonly used to treat a variety of infections in cats, particularly upper respiratory infections. Because it can kill infections, a small dose can help to relieve your cat’s UTI symptoms and alleviate the infection.

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6. Uva Ursi

Uva ursi has long been thought to be an antiseptic, diuretic, and antibacterial for the urinary tract. People have taken this herb and given it to their cats as well to treat UTIs.

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7. Cranberries

According to studies, drinking cranberry juice can help to cure a UTI in a person. It does this by preventing bacteria from adhering to the urinary tract. If the bacteria can’t stick to the urinary tract, then it can’t cause an infection.

Unfortunately, cranberry juice is too high in sugar to feed to your cat. But there are alternatives. You can try a few drops of a cranberry concentrate that won’t have as much sugar as cranberry juice.

Alternatively, you could get a pet-specific cranberry supplement such as Cranberry Relief by NaturVet. It’s a safe and effective way to supplement your cat’s diet with cranberries without giving them too much sugar. The formula also includes echinacea, so you’re getting extra protection against UTIs.

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8. D-Mannose

D-Mannose is a sugar that doesn’t get metabolized and doesn’t affect blood sugar levels. This is the same sugar that’s in cranberry juice that makes it an effective cure for UTIs in cats as well. Once consumed, bacteria in the bladder bond to the D-Mannose molecules. Then, the D-Mannose is excreted from the body in the urine, taking the offending bacteria with it.

If you’re looking for a D-Mannose supplement to help cure your cat’s UTI, then check out this one from Nature’s Pure Edge.

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9. Bone Broth

We’ve already discussed the importance of keeping your cat well hydrated when it comes to curing and preventing UTIs. But as the old saying goes: you can lead a cat to water but you can’t make it drink…or something like that. So, how do you get your cat more hydrated if you can’t force them to drink water?

Bone broth is a great alternative to plain water. It will help get lots of fluids into your cat to keep them well hydrated and will also provide helpful nutrients for fighting any existing infections. Cats love bone broth and you should have no difficulty getting your cat to drink some, so use this anytime you aren’t sure if your cat is hydrated enough.

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10. Nettle

Nettle is often used in UTI treatments for people. It’s a natural diuretic that helps to flush the system and increase urination. It also helps to reduce inflammation and pain.

But this helpful herb isn’t just for humans; it can also help when your cat has this unfortunate infection. It can help to flush the harmful bacteria from their system while reducing their discomfort and even helping to alleviate the inflammation of their urinary tract.

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11. Parsley Leaf

Since hydration is such a key factor in healing UTIs and preventing them altogether, it’s important to get your cat to drink as much water as possible. Parsley naturally encourages thirst, so using some parsley leaf can help to get your cat drinking more water.

But that’s not where this herb’s usefulness ends. It’s also a natural diuretic with antibacterial properties. It will cause your cat to urinate more, which can help to flush the infection from their system. But it can also help kill the bacteria in your cat’s urinary tract, healing the infection.

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12. Marshmallow Root

Marshmallow root is full of a substance called mucilage, a mucus that helps to coat membranes, soothing irritation and reducing inflammation while killing off harmful bacteria. Moreover, marshmallow root gives a kickstart to the immune system, kills bacteria, and reduces inflammation.

When your cat has a UTI, the mucilage can help to reduce the discomfort and pain they’re experiencing since the urinary and digestive tracts are linked by mucus membranes. Meanwhile, it helps to kill off any bacteria that’s causing the UTI while also reducing the inflammation that’s causing your cat discomfort and pain. It’s also great for your cat’s digestive tract and can help reduce constipation and diarrhea as well.

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13. Corn Silk

Hydration is key to reducing or curing UTIs, so you may think that a diuretic would make things worse. But corn silk, a natural diuretic, can help to flush the system out by increasing water elimination. This means your cat will need to drink plenty of water!

But the combination of increased water intake and increased urination from the corn silk can help to flush your cat’s urinary tract and get rid of unhealthy bacteria, stones, crystals, and more.

How to Prevent UTIs in Cats

Once your cat has a UTI, you have to take whatever measures are available to cure it. But the best cure is to prevent it altogether. There are several steps you can take to help prevent UTIs in the future, mostly centered around proper hydration and nutrition.

Ensure Adequate Hydration

This has already been mentioned, but it’s so important that it warrants a repeat. Cats have a very low thirst drive and tend not to drink much water. This can be a major factor in UTIs and urinary tract disease.

To help prevent these unfortunate urinary tract complications from occurring, you’ll want to ensure your cat is always fully hydrated. This starts with leaving water within reach of your feline at all times, but that may not be enough.

Since their thirst drive is so low, you may need to entice your cat to drink through other methods. Try giving them bone broth; a tasty alternative to water that will hydrate them sufficiently and should be easy to get any cat to drink.

Use Canned Cat Food

For dogs, eating dry food is par for the course. But dogs don’t have a low thirst drive like cats. When you combine a low thirst drive with dry food that can actually dehydrate your cat further, you’re exacerbating the dehydration issue.

In the wild, cats get most of their water intake from the live food sources they eat. Your cat may be well domesticated, but you can still offer it hydration through its food by using canned cat food instead of dry food.

Canned cat food holds plenty of moisture that can help keep your cat hydrated. And you’ll probably never have a difficult time getting your cat to eat some moist cat food, even if they don’t seem to want to drink any water.

Avoid Stressful Situations

As it turns out, humans and cats are affected pretty similarly by stress. Just as your health can decline when you’re going through stressful situations or periods in your life, your cat’s health can erode when it becomes too stressed.

This stress can cause inflammation within the bladder, infections, and other health issues. By assuring your cat isn’t getting too stressed out, you can prevent a myriad of health concerns from becoming a reality.

When Should You Go To The Vet?

If left untreated, a UTI can get worse and cause additional problems for your feline. Bladder stones and even kidney infections can develop if the UTI isn’t addressed in time. Worse, UTIs can even lead to FLUTD.

At the first sign of any UTI symptoms, you might be able to head off the infection and cure it early with one or more of the at-home natural remedies we’ve shared with you. But if things continue to get worse, you’ll need to take your cat to see a professional and ensure it gets the proper care necessary for treating a full-blown UTI.

If your cat is completely unable to urinate, you’ll need to take it to the vet. Likewise, if you see that their urine is bloody, things might be getting serious and you need to see a vet. Also, seek professional help if your cat is in high levels of pain.

Your vet can determine whether a UTI is the real issue or not and then treat the problem from there. They often use antibiotics to cure such ailments and this might be the only option if your cat’s UTI has progressed past the beginning stages.

Conclusion

UTIs are fairly common in cats, particularly due to their low thirst drive. By ensuring your cat is adequately hydrated by feeding it moist, canned food and getting it to drink plenty of fluids, you can help to prevent UTIs from ever developing. But if your cat does get a UTI, you can try some of our natural home remedies like apple cider vinegar, D-Mannose, or parsley leaf.

Remember, if your cat is in obvious pain, unable to urinate, or is peeing blood, you need to take it to the vet right away. If caught early enough, these natural remedies might help to heal and eliminate a UTI. But if it gets past the beginning stages, your cat might need antibiotics or other help that only a professional can offer.

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Featured Image Credit: photosforyou, Pixabay

Contents Overview

Christian Adams

An American expat living in Metro Manila, Philippines for over a decade, Christian is a lifelong cat lover and the proud papa of two rescue cats, Trixie and Chloe. Both girls were formerly among the droves of strays that roam the cities and countryside. Three-year-old Trixie was pulled from a litter found under the porch of a neighbor’s house, while two-year-old Chloe was brought home by Christian’s young son, Henry, who found the kitten crying in the parking lot. As Editor in Chief of ExcitedCats.com, Christian is thrilled to be a part of the pro-feline movement.

Источник: https://excitedcats.com/natural-remedies-for-cat-utis/

Out of all of life’s many annoyances, UTIs rank pretty high (probably somewhere above “trip to the DMV,” but below “bridal party email thread”). If you have yet to actually experience one, consider yourself lucky: They’re inconvenient, incredibly uncomfortable and sometimes painful reminders that being a lady is super fun.

Urinary tract infections happen when bacteria gets trapped in the bladder, urethra, or any other part of the urinary system. While men do occasionally get them, they’re way more common in women (like, we get them 30 times as often as men do!). And that's down to anatomy: Because a woman’s urethra is shorter than a man’s, it’s easier for bacteria to enter and make itself at home.

Most UTIs are caused by E. coli, which can enter the urethra post-sex or after improper wiping. The bacteria can take root and replicate, leading to an infection of either the bladder (which is called cystitis) or urethra (called urethritis).

If you experience symptoms such as burning or painful urination, the urge to pee frequently (even when you know you don’t have to), cloudy or strange-smelling urine, or see blood or pus in your urine, you might have a UTI.

Left untreated, a UTI could easily spread to your kidneys and cause lasting damage, which is why you should make an appointment with your doctor stat. They’ll likely do a culture to determine if your symptoms are due to a UTI or some other infection and treat you accordingly. If you have a UTI, your doc will prescribe antibiotics, which (thankfully) get to work surprisingly quickly.

While you wait for the antibiotics to kick in, there are some easy natural remedies for UTIs that can help alleviate your symptoms and prevent UTIs in the future.

vitamin c pills supplement uti remedies

1. Drink more water

You should be drinking plenty of water anyway, but if you aren’t always great about remembering to fill up your water bottle in the middle of the day, it’s important to make an effort to increase your water intake if you’ve been diagnosed with (or suspect you have) a urinary tract infection. The more water you drink, the more you’ll have to pee; the more you pee, the more bacteria will be flushed out of your urethra every time you use the bathroom.

Upping your H20 consumption may also help prevent UTIs in the future, according to a 2017 study of 140 premenopausal women dealing with recurring infections. Study participants were divided into two groups; one group stuck to their usual water-drinking habits over the course of a year, while the other group drank an additional 1.5 liters of water a day (on top of their usual fluid intake). By the end of the study, the group drinking extra water saw a “significant” decrease in the mean number of infections compared to the control.

2. Reach for the (unsweetened) cranberry juice

Cranberries (and cranberry juice) have long been touted as a way to prevent urinary tract infections. That's because cranberries contain a specific kind of polyphenol (a compound found in plants) that acts on E. coli and other bacteria as an anti-adhesive, making it harder for the harmful microorganisms to stick to urethra walls.

However, it should be noted that research is mixed on the subject—most recently, a 2017 review found that "limited evidence exists for cranberries in reducing the risk of [recurrent UTIs]," and that "evidence for cranberry juice in preventing UTIs was less than previously thought," although it noted that there aren't any known downsides to drinking the stuff, either. (And some experts still recommend drinking cranberry juice as a preventative measure.)

If you do want to give cranberry juice a try, skip the cranberry cocktail in the juice aisle of your local grocery store and opt for the unsweetened variety instead. Sugary beverages can irritate your bladder, which will only make you feel worse than you already do. (BTW, you should also hold off on drinking coffee, alcohol and soda while you’re being treated for a UTI.)

3. Pop some vitamin C

In addition to its overall immunity-boosting properties, vitamin C may help reduce the risk of urinary tract infections by making urine more acidic, thereby limiting bacteria growth. The authors of the metastudy mentioned above also say that vitamin C plays quite nicely with methenamine hippurate (MH), an antibiotic commonly used to treat urinary tract infections. MH reacts with acid in the urine to create formaldehyde, which is deadly to E. coli and other bacteria. So basically vitamin C could help your antibiotics work even better.

4. Pee when you need to …

You may pride yourself on your ability to sit through marathon meetings without taking a bathroom break, but don’t sacrifice your bladder just because you don’t want to miss a minute of your boss’s riveting quarterly sales projections. If you habitually hold in your pee, research suggests you could be putting yourself at risk for a UTI. The longer urine sits in your bladder, the more time bacteria that has entered your urethra has to settle in and multiply.

5. …and definitely, definitely pee after sex

Although the jury is still out on whether or not there’s actually a relationship between peeing after intercourse and UTIs, there is some scientific evidence that women who go to the bathroom before and after sex are much less likely to get UTIs than women who do not. (That same study also found that there may be a connection between diaphragm and spermicide use and UTIs.)

6. Apply heat

If you’re dealing with pain in your lower belly thanks to your UTI, a heating pad or hot water bottle may provide temporary relief.

7. Try garlic (extract) or bearberry leaf

A 2009 study of male rats showed a “statistically significant” drop in bacterial growth and inflammation when the rats were given garlic, while the author of a 2010 study found that garlic extract had an antimicrobial effect even on some antibiotic-resistant strains of S. aureus and E. coli. And in a small study of 57 women suffering from recurring UTIs, the group who supplemented with bearberry leaf (a.k.a. uva-ursi) saw a significant decrease in the number of recurring infections compared to the control group over the course of the year-long study.

It should be noted that these studies are small, and some of them were only on rats or in a petri dish—so take these findings with a grain of salt. And as with all herbal supplements, talk to your doctor first to make sure they don't interact with any other meds you're taking.

Источник: https://www.wellandgood.com/natural-remedies-for-uti/

Deep insights into urinary tract infections and effective natural remedies

This review was based on data extracted from published papers with the search terms of urinary tract infection, herbal medicine, vitamin, probiotics, supplements, and antibacterial resistance which are available in all relevant databases, especially PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, MEDLINE, and EMBASE, without limitation up to August 1, 2020.

Herbal medicine

In recent years, the use of medicinal herbs in the prevention and treatment of various diseases has been increased [13, 21]. Complimentary therapy with medicinal herbs is a research area that may be deserving of special attention. The complementary therapy of antibiotics with medicinal herbs showed mainly synergistic effects [11]. In many studies, herbal medicines could reduce bacterial resistance to antibiotics, remarkably [15, 16]. So, in many cases, patients may benefit from this type of therapy. It was shown that herbal medicines could play an important role in the treatment of a type of UTI [22]. Since several plant antimicrobial compounds contain various functional groups in their structure, the antimicrobial activities are attributed to multiple mechanisms [13]. The chemical compounds presented in herbal medicines evolved to protect the plant from pathogenic microorganisms and therefore could prevent or treat infections in animals. Many of these compounds are renally excreted so that they are specifically useful as urinary antiseptic agents. Two major mechanisms are involved in the antimicrobial properties of these compounds. Some of them directly kill microbes and some of them interfere with microbial adhesion to epithelial cells [23]. These herbs play an important role in assisting to resolve UTI. Here, we briefly review the role of medicinal herbs and their variant in the treatment of infections. Some of these herbal medicines with more details are illustrated in Fig. 1.

Used herbal medicines in the treatment of UTI. The active constituents with the related mechanism of action(s) are also described

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Arctostaphylos uva-ursi

Arctostaphylos uva-ursi (bearberry) is a plant species of the genus Arctostaphylos. The leaves of this plant have been traditionally used because of their diuretic properties [23]. The plant has been used for the treatment of infectious diseases, especially for UTIs. The herb is approved in Germany for the treatment of bladder infections and effective against E. coli in the bladder [24].

The leaves of the plant are responsible for the therapeutic actions which contain the glycoside arbutoside. This compound is hydrolyzed in the bowel to glucose and the aglycone hydroquinone which is absorbed and glucuronidated in the liver. Hydroquinone glucuronide is then carried to the kidneys and excreted in the urine. In the alkaline condition of urine, the hydroquinone glucuronide will decompose automatically and hydroquinone which is worked as a direct antimicrobial agent will be released [23].

It should be noted that based on information from laboratory researches exposure to synthetic hydroquinone for the long-term may be carcinogenic, so that it is recommended the consecutive consumption of this herbal medicine should not be extended more than two weeks.

Tannins presented in this plant could potentiate the in vitro antibacterial activities of β-lactam antibiotics against methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Consequently, due to that whole plant extracts contain other constituents that increase antibacterial activities, it is recommended to use whole plant extracts instead of isolated arbutoside.

Juniperus communis

Juniperus communis (juniper), which belongs to the Cupressaceae family, and other closely related species including Juniperus monosperma (Engelm) Sarg and Juniperus osteosperma (Utah juniper) show remarkable antimicrobial activities [25]. It was reported that terpenoids in the leaf of the herbs are responsible for the antibacterial and diuretic activities of the herbs [23]. Schilcer reported that Juniper oil was effective against urinary tract infections [26]. Leaf and berries of the plant show antimicrobial activities against urinary tract infections. The main antibacterial constituent of this plant is terpinen-4-ol, a volatile oil, which plays an important role in the treatment of UTIs [27]. This plant also contains other active agents such as oxygenated sesquiterpene, β-pinene, sabinene, monoterpene hydrocarbons, limonene, and myrcene [22]. It should be noted that the volatile oil of juniper contains nephrotoxic compounds, especially hydrocarbon terpenoids. However, these adverse effects might only be seen after receiving high doses which far exceeded the therapeutic dose [23].

It was indeed previously demonstrated that the extracts presented diuretic activity [27]. The juniper leaf infusions show more diuretic activity than the volatile oil, which suggests that other constituents contribute to the diuretic activity of the herb.

Vaccinium macrocarpon (cranberry)

Many researchers have suggested that cranberry is active against UTIs. The plant belongs to Ericaceae family and can be potentially active against E. coli, the leading causes of bacteria-mediated UTIs, by reduction of bacterial attaching to the walls of the bladder, and then, the bacteria are more likely to be washed out during urination. Cranberry juice intake leads to measurable protection against both sensitive and resistant strains of E. coli [28]. It could also inhibit the binding of bacteria to gastrointestinal mucosa [29]. It was shown that cranberry juice consumption reduced the biofilm formation of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive uropathogens [30, 31].

Cranberry contains proanthocyanidins, which are stable phenolic compounds and contribute to the anti-adhesion activity against E. coli. Also, the in vitro antibacterial activities of cranberry extracts and juice against other pathogens such as S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, K. pneumoniae, and P. mirabilis have been previously demonstrated [32]. Cranberry proanthocyanidins mainly contain A-type and B-type linkages, while in comparison with B-type linkage, A-type linkage is more effective in preventing adhesion of P-fimbriated uropathogenic E. coli to uroepithelial cells of the bladder and responsible for anti-adhesion activities of the extract, therefore inhibiting the ability of E. coli to infect the urinary mucosa [33, 34].

Cranberry also contains other biologically active constituents such as anthocyanidin, catechin, flavanols, myricetin, quercetin, and phenolics which are supposed to be responsible for its activities [35].

The other possible mechanism of action of cranberry might be related to acidification of the urine; however, it only causes temporary effects, and the changes last about 15 min in most people. Therefore, this mechanism could not be of relevance.

Due to these health benefits of cranberry extract, different commercial formulations of the extract exist in the market. In acute situations, the usual dose of the juice is 250–500 ml two to three times daily and for prevention consumption of 250–500 ml per day is enough. The solid dosage forms such as capsules that contain concentrated cranberry extract are also available. In acute situations, taking 2–3 capsules two to four times per day and taking 1 two to three times daily for prevention are recommended [36].

In summary, the existing data indicate the beneficial effects of cranberry preparations against UTIs; however, these effects are mainly related to prophylactic activities by preventing the development of infections or in combination with conventional antibiotics and solely intake of the herb is not recommended for UTI treatment.

Vaccinium myrtillus (Blueberry)

Blueberry has extensively been used traditionally to treat and prevent UTI. Blueberry extracts contain similar constituents as cranberry extracts, and the extracts possess similar anti-adhesive activities against uropathogenic bacteria and the bacteria are significantly less able to adhere to the walls of the bladder [24, 37]. Tannins are the most active constituents of blueberry extracts against UTI.

Cinnamomum verum (Cinnamon)

Cinnamon belongs to the Lauraceae family and shows antioxidant and antibacterial activities. It contains bioactive phytochemical compounds such as trans-cinnamaldehyde, eugenol, trans-cinnamyl acetate, and proanthocyanidins which have been used in the treatment of UTI.

Amalaradjou et al. showed that trans-cinnamaldehyde as an essential oil was able to inhibit biofilm formation of E. coli on urinary catheters by downregulating major virulence genes in the bacteria.

Various mechanisms are involved in antibacterial activities of essential oils: (I) due to their hydrophobicity, these molecules could target the lipid-containing bacterial cell membrane and mitochondria and alter the permeability which finally leads to leakage of ions and other cell contents, (II) inhibiting energy generation and glucose uptake, and (III) inhibiting activities of important enzymes such as amino acid decarboxylases [38].

Agathosma betulina (buchu)

A. betulina is one of the oldest known herbs for the treatment of uncomplicated UTI [39]. The leaves of the herb contain various phenolic compounds and have been used as an herbal remedy for urinary tracts, because of the diuretic and antiseptic properties. In a study, it was demonstrated that the ethanolic leaf extract of A. betulina showed antibacterial activities against E. coli, K. pneumoniae, P. mirabilis, P. aeruginosa, S. aureus, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, and E. faecalis [40]. For a preparation containing the leaves extract of A. betulina, the anti-adhesive properties were investigated, and the results showed the anti-adhesive effects of the preparation by interacting with T24 cells [41].

Hybanthus enneaspermus

H. enneaspermus was studied to evaluate the in vitro antibacterial activity of various types of extracts against the major UTI including E. coli, P. aeruginosa, K. pneumoniae, P. mirabilis, E. faecalis, and S. aureus. Among the extracts, ethanol extract showed the most antibacterial activities against the pathogens. The extract has various bioactive compounds such as flavonoids, terpenes, phenolic, and alkaloids that the therapeutic values are attributed to the presence of them.

Armoracia rusticana (horseradish)

A. rusticana (synonyms: Cochlearia armoracia, Radicula armoracia), which belongs to the family Brassicaceae, traditionally has been used to treat UTI. It shows favorable results for the prevention of recurrent UTI in pediatric patients [42]. It was demonstrated that the isothiocyanates of horseradish are responsible for their antibacterial activities of the herb. It was shown that these bioactive compounds could block the pathogenic process of human cell penetration by uropathogenic E. coli [43].

Hydrastis canadensis (Goldenseal)

H. canadensis (Goldenseal) has been used traditionally to treat various diseases such as digestive disorders, UTI, and skin diseases and also to check internal hemorrhage [44]. The rhizome, rootlets, and root hairs of the herb produce bioactive alkaloids and isoquinoline alkaloids [45]. These bioactive compounds may act similarly to proanthocyanidins, which are found in cranberry, in inhibiting bacteria from sticking to the bladder walls [24].

Berberine is a bioactive herbal alkaloid which presents in various medicinal plants such as H. Canadensis, Berberis aquifolium, B. vulgaris, and B. aristata [13]. This compound has been used in the treatment of UTI [46]. Notably, berberine exerts its antibacterial activities against UTI with interfering adhesion of E. coli to bladder epithelium.

Equisetum arvense (Horsetail)

E. arvense (Horsetail) is one of the oldest and most famous herbal medicine. The plant has a vast variety of therapeutic properties such as antibacterial activities [47, 48]. It was shown that the ethanol extract of the herb showed antibacterial activities against urinary tract pathogens including E. coli, K. pneumonia, P. mirabilis, P. aeruginosa, S. aureus, S. saprophyticus, and E. faecalis. The commonly known phytochemical compounds from Horsetail are alkaloids, phytosterols, tannin, triterpenoids, and phenolics [49]. Among them, phenolic compounds, especially flavonoids, present in the plant extracts are responsible for the antibacterial activities [50]. The essential oil of the herb was shown to possess broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities against tested strains.

Urtica dioica (nettle)

U. dioica (nettle) is a perennial plant of the Urticaceae family and has been traditionally used for the treatment of various diseases such as arthritis, rheumatism, UTI, kidney stones, and gingivitis [51].

It was shown that the plant extracts exhibit antimicrobial activities against various Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria such as Bacillus subtilis, Lactobacillus plantarum, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, K. pneumoniae, S. aureus, and S. epidermidis [52]. The leaf of the herb is a valuable source of biologically active compounds that show antimicrobial activities and could be used to treat infectious diseases [53].

It should be noted that the role of nettle in the treatment of UTI might be due to the diuretic activities of the herb [54].

Plantago major L.

P. major L. belongs to the Plantagináceae family and is used traditionally for the treatment of several diseases such as infectious diseases, pain relief, and reducing fever. The major chemical compositions of the herb include mucilage, organic acids, polysaccharides, and flavonoids. The herb traditionally has been used in Iran for pulmonary infections, stomach ulcers, and infections [55].

Other herbs

The essential oil of Salvia officinalis showed inhibitory activities against clinically isolated uropathogens [56]. Barosma betulina has been used traditionally for the treatment of various diseases such as UTI, catarrhal cystitis, and urethritis. The in vitro studies showed its antimicrobial effects against uropathogens. Other herbs that have been used for the treatment of UTIs but are not yet adequately studied include Mentha piperita, Allium sativum, Terminalia chebula, Taraxacum officinalis, and Zingiber officinale [22].

Nutrition therapy

Using nutrients is an integral part of the management, prevention, and treatment of UTIs. In most cases, micronutrients have been used to this end and they are included vitamins and minerals in general. The role of each agent in the prevention or treatment of UTIs is illustrated in Fig. 2.

The role of nutrition therapy in the prevention and treatment of UTIs. The ingredients with the related mechanism of action(s) are also described

Full size image

Vitamins

Vitamin C possesses antimicrobial activities and is frequently used as an important supplement to antibiotic therapy for UTI [57]. Vitamin C is considered as a non-enzymatic antioxidant that slows down the production of free radicals and oxidation, which leads to strengthening the immune system and the deficiencies of vitamin C could place the persons at risk for infections due to the negative impacts on immune function [58]. Various studies have been conducted to show the efficacy of vitamin C in the management of UTIs. Yousefichaijan et al. studied the efficacy of vitamin C supplementation on UTI in children for 14 days. The results showed that vitamin C supplementation was able to control the symptoms of UTI, including dysuria, fever, urinary urgency, and also dribbling urine [59]. Ochoa et al. investigated the role of a daily intake of vitamin C for its effect on UTIs during pregnancy. They showed that daily usage of vitamin C has significant effects on the reduction of UTIs and also improving the health level of the women [60]. The formation of struvite stones is associated with UTIs by urease-producing bacteria. It was shown that the vitamin can modulate the struvite crystal formation in the presence of uropathogenic bacteria [61]. In another study, the combination of cranberries, a probiotic (Lactobacillus rhamnosus), and vitamin C has been used to evaluate the clinical benefits due to their additive or synergistic effects. The results showed that the approach might represent a safe and effective option in UTI management [62]. It was shown that nitrite may be generated by bacteria in urine during UTI. Acidification of nitrite leads to the formation of nitric oxide (NO) and other reactive nitrogen oxides that are toxic for a wide range of microorganisms. In a study, NO formation and bacterial growth in mildly acidified urine containing nitrite and vitamin C as a reducing agent were investigated. The growth of bacteria was markedly reduced by the addition of nitrite to acidified urine. Additionally, the inhibition was enhanced by vitamin C. These results help to explain the bacteriostatic effects of acidified nitrite because of the release of NO and other toxic reactive nitrogen intermediates and also the role of vitamin C in the treatment and prevention of UTI [63].

The positive role of vitamin A supplementation in the prevention and treatment of UTI has been mentioned previously [64]. Vitamin A has been used in the management of UTIs in children. The results of the study indicated that in the group of the children who received 200,000 IU of the vitamin in combination with antibiotics, the incidence of UTIs was lower than the control group [65]. In another study, vitamin A supplementation in addition to antimicrobial therapy was used to improve UTI symptoms and preventing renal scarring in girls who suffer from acute pyelonephritis. The results showed that vitamin A supplementation is an effective approach for improving the clinical symptoms of UTI and also reducing the renal injury and scarring following acute pyelonephritis [66]. Sobouti et al. studied the effects of vitamin A or E supplementation in addition to antimicrobial therapy for the prevention of renal scarring in acute pyelonephritis. According to the results, vitamins A or E supplements were effective in reducing renal scarring secondary to acute pyelonephritis [67]. The other study was conducted to determine the effect of vitamin A supplementation on the rate of permanent renal damage in children with acute pyelonephritis. It was demonstrated that the administration of vitamin A leads to a significant reduction in permanent renal damage [68].

Different mechanisms have been mentioned for the implication of vitamin D on the management of UTI. It was shown that tight junction proteins play important roles in preventing the bacterial invasion of the epithelial barrier and supplementation with vitamin D could strengthen the urinary bladder lining and restore the bladder epithelial integrity [69]. Additionally, on the one hand, vitamin D could act as a local immune response mediator in UTI and on the other hand, enhancing vitamin D levels leads to modulate the innate immune system and provides a protective response to infection [70, 71]. The relation between the status serum level of vitamin D and the risk of UTI has been studied extensively, and the results showed a significant association between increased risk of UTI and vitamin D insufficiency, as an independent risk factor, especially in children [72,73,74]. Women with vitamin D deficiencies show a higher risk level of UTI during pregnancy [75]. Vitamin D deficiency is common and the proven risk factor for UTIs especially in girls and supplementation with vitamin D could prevent first-time UTI [76]. In a randomized clinical trial, the subjects who received vitamin D3 (20,000 IU per week) for five years showed better prevention against UTI [77]. Together, these results demonstrate that vitamin D supplementation provides a potent weapon in the prevention of UTI.

Minerals

The role of zinc in the management of the infectious disease has been described extensively [17, 78]. It was shown that the element increases the response to treatment in many infections and active against different pathogens such as E. coli, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Salmonella typhi, and Streptococcus pyogenes [79,80,81]. The incidence of zinc deficiency in infectious disease clinics has been reported extensively [82, 83]. The results of the Mohsenpour et al. study showed that serum zinc levels in people with recurrent UTI were lower than those in the control group. So, the zinc level could be assumed as a risk factor for recurrent UTI [84]. In another study, the relation between serum zinc levels in children inflicted with UTI and the control group was assessed. According to the data, lower zinc levels were associated with susceptibility to UTI, and therefore, zinc administration has been suggested [85].

Microbial infections are often associated with selenium deficiencies. The main physiological properties of this micronutrient are directly attributed to its presence within selenoproteins [11]. Selenium at a certain concentration was effective in preventing uropathogenic E. coli biofilm formation on urinary catheters. Further, the inhibitory effects were associated with a reduction in EPS production and gene expression of the bacteria. Additionally, at higher concentrations, selenium was effective in inactivating preformed bacterial biofilms on catheters within 3 days of incubation. These observations suggested that selenium could be potentially used in the control of bacterial biofilms on the catheters [86]. Also, it was shown that selenium-containing analogs of L-proline and L-cystine are effective in the treatment of UTI [87]. A study was conducted to compare the blood level of retinol and selenium in a person who suffered from minor lower urinary lesions. The results showed that there was a significant difference in the mean blood level of selenium between cases and control groups [88].

Copper, Cu, is an essential micronutrient for optimal innate immune function, and the nutritional deficiency of this element leads to increased susceptibility to bacterial infections [11]. During clinical UTI, uropathogenic E. coli upregulated the expression of copper efflux genes in patients. And, this element as a host effector could be involved in protection against pathogen colonization of the urinary tract [89]. Moreover, Cu export transport in bacteria has been addressed as an important virulence and fitness determinants during UTI [90]. Copper supplementation in drinking water has been suggested as an effective approach to reducing E. coli colonization in the urinary bladder of the animal model [91].

Other agents

Citrate salts could be used in the management of UTI due to their ability to alkalinize the urine, and alkaline urine is helpful for UTI symptoms such as dysuria. It was shown that by the administration of sodium citrate in women with UTI problems for 48 h, the symptoms were significantly improved in 80 percent of the subjects [92]. Additionally, alkalinity in the urine provides an effective environment for some of the antimicrobial agents such as uva-ursi and berberine to perform their function [37]. The role of these salts in the treatment of urinary candidiasis has been mentioned in an earlier study [93].

Simple sugars such as D-mannose could prevent the adherence of pathogens to uroepithelial cells. Various evidences show that the implementation of mannose exerts beneficial results in the treatment of UTI. It was shown that a mannose-specific lectin exists on the surface of adherent strains of E. coli and the sugar acts as the primary bladder cell receptor site for UPEC to bind [94]. Likewise, it was reported that in the adhesion of UPEC to the uroepithelial cells, the first step is the binding of FimH adhesin to the bladder epithelium through the interaction of mannose moieties with the host cell surface [95]. So, the use of the sugar or its analogs can help to block the adhesion of E. coli to the bladder epithelium. The efficacy of these sugars in controlling UTI has been studied previously [96,97,98].

An in vivo study indicated that demonstrated D-mannose in mice not only blocked adhesion of E. coli to the epithelium of the urinary tract but also prevent bacterial invasion and biofilm formation [99]. Also, in the presence of D-mannose, the adherence of clinical isolates of E. coli was inhibited remarkably [100]. Oral supplementation of D-mannose decreases the perception of lower urinary tract symptoms in postmenopausal women [101]. The results of another study indicated that D-mannose efficiently blocked the adhesive properties of all type 1 fimbriae-positive isolates of E. coli in low concentration, but did not show any bacteriostatic effects [102]. The results of another study demonstrated that antibiotic therapy in combination with long-term enrichment of the diet with D-mannose leads to prolongation of the inter-relapse period of uncomplicated UTI [97].

The effects of different derivatives of the sugar in the control of UTIs were studied. Klein et al. synthesized and evaluated the efficacy of these sugars in blocking bacterial-host interaction. Among them, para-substituted biphenyl derivative was the most effective agent in controlling UTIs. Following oral administration of this compound, bacterial numbers were reduced by twofold and fourfold in the urine and bladder, respectively [103].

Probiotics

Probiotics are living microorganisms which when administered in certain numbers exert a health benefit on the host [104]. The clinical efficacy of probiotics for adjunct treatment in the treatment of different gastrointestinal and urinary tract infections has been addressed previously [105]. They have demonstrated positive effects in the treatment and prevention of rotavirus diarrhea and alleviation of the antibiotic-associated intestinal adverse effects by recognizing the commensal microbiota and also restoration of the microbial ecosystem after an imbalance or infection [106]. Probiotics are clinically proven to be effective in the management of UTI including accelerating recovery after UTI and also decreasing recurrent UTI in children [107]. It must be emphasized that, for better effectiveness of probiotics, they must be able to colonize in the intestinal and/or urogenital region [108]. These positive effects of probiotics might be attributed to the intrinsic properties of microorganisms. For example, lactobacilli are able to grow in an environment with pH ≤ 4.5, where they could multiply and produce additional antibacterial molecules, such as bacteriocin and hydrogen peroxide [109, 110]. Besides these advantages, probiotics could produce biosurfactants that inhibit the growth of uropathogens by reducing the adhesion of the pathogens to the uroepithelium. Moreover, lactobacilli could co-aggregate with uropathogens and block their adhesion to the urinary tract and also displace previously adherent uropathogens from uroepithelium. This process can create a microenvironment in which the inhibitory products of lactobacilli can concentrate on the pathogens and therefore inhibit the pathogens [111]. It is worth noting that the most effective lactobacilli for controlling UTI are L. rhamnosus GR-1 and L. reuteri B-54 and RC-14 which have been proven [108].

The common vaginal Lactobacillus species were used to investigate the inhibition of E. coli growth. The results showed that when L. crispatus was incubated with clinical E. coli strains, the growth of E. coli was inhibited in the acidic environment [112]. Wolff et al. studied the changes in the ratio between uropathogens and Lactobacillus (U/L) within the lower UTI in response to oral probiotic supplementation. Based on the results, there were no changes between groups in terms of microbiota diversity and the use of oral probiotic did not alter the U/L ratio [113]. The physicochemical cell surface, adhesion properties, and the antagonistic activity of recombinant Lactococcus lactis containing the Ama r 2 gene against the E. coli causing UTI in humans were studied. The results indicated that this recombinant probiotic showed desirable properties and the Ama r 2 gene expression did not affect the positive probiotic properties [114].

The ability of a clinically isolated probiotic, L. fermentum strain 4–17, to adhere to human intestinal was studied. L. fermentum strain 4–17 showed appropriate anti-adhesive properties against human pathogenic bacteria [115].

Osset et al. [116] studied the antimicrobial activities of 15 Lactobacillus species against pathogens. Among them, L. crispatus could block pathogen adhesion efficiently.

The results of another study revealed that a pyelonephritic E. coli was sensitive to L. rhamnosus, Bifidobacterium lactis, and Bifidobacterium longus and these probiotics were able to suppress the growth of enteric and urinary pathogens [117].

Oral administration of multispecies probiotic formulations showed antimicrobial activities against the pathogens that are responsible for vaginal dysbiosis and infections [118].

The effects of vaginal suppositories of probiotics for the prevention and treatment of UTI have been studied previously. The concept for instilling probiotic into the vagina might be related to the belief that by the presence of probiotic as the dominant bacterium the ascension of uropathogens into the bladder was restricted by various mechanisms, such as interfering with pathogen adhesion, biofilm formation reduction, reducing the expression of virulence factors, and also modulation of the host’s defense systems to better combat infection [108]. The Lactobacillus strains inhibited the growth of E. coli via the production of organic acids. Additionally, the adhesion and internalization of E. coli into HeLa cells were reduced by probiotics [119]. Reid et al. investigated the effect of probiotic lactobacilli in controlling acute UTI in women. Based on the results, recurrence reduced remarkably in the Lactobacillus group compared to the placebo group [120].

Taken together, the results of these aforementioned studies demonstrated the potential benefit of probiotics in controlling UTI.

Additionally, site-oriented probiotic therapy has been recognized as one of the most promising therapeutic alternatives for the prevention of UTI in post-antibiotic therapy [112].

While most clinical research showed using these natural substances represents a promising approach, further studies are needed to prove their mechanism of action and clinical effectiveness. It should be noted that formulating these substances in a single dosage form and their side effects and interactions with each other are the main limitations of developing a new formulation.

Источник: https://afju.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s12301-020-00111-z

A UTI (urinary tract infection) can be painful, irritating, and downright tiresome. And sometimes, they can even be a little bit troubling for our overall health. But do home remedies for a UTI work?

You usually know if you've developed a UTI if you're peeing way more than usual, experience burning when you do go, smelly, cloudy pee, or if you have a random, dull ache in your stomach.

A UTI will leave you feeling generally groggy too, with an uncomfortable feeling below your waistline.

Women are actually far more likely to get a UTI than men, with almost half of all women guaranteed to experience at least one UTI in their lifetime according to the US National Library of Medicine.

MORE:Your vagina is ageing: a timeline of changes down there, from your 30s to your 60s

Urinary tract infections are sometimes caused by bacteria from your *ahem* excrement, entering your urinary tract (or, urethra), either by improper wiping, sex, or pure chance. Women have a far shorter urethra than men, explaining why UTIs happen far more to them. They can also occur during pregnancy, or to people who have a weakened immune system or conditions that block the urinary tract.

But some things can increase your risk of getting a UTI include:

  • having sex
  • wiping your bottom from back to front after going to the toilet
  • being younger than 1 or older than 75
  • being pregnant
  • using adiaphragmfor contraception
  • havingdiabetes
  • having a weakened immune system

A trip to the doctors can normally have you feeling better pretty quickly, with most GP's likely to provide antibiotics in order to treat the infection. However, Caroline Overton, Consultant Gynaecologist and Spokesperson for the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, explained that antibiotics are not always needed. She said, "Mild cases may get better by themselves within a few days."

You'll need to make sure to take the whole course, to stop your symptoms coming back, and should generally start feeling better in a few days. Very rarely will you experience more severe symptoms of a UTI, which could the need for a hospital stay and further tests. However, this is normally more common in men, children, or older people.

It's important that you do visit your GP, as, left untreated, UTIs can develop into something pretty nasty, with the potental to spread to your kidneys - which could make you seriously unwell. Caroline told w&h, "Women should seek help urgently from the GP or by phoning 111 if they have symptoms of a kidney infection; symptoms include pain in the sides or lower back, a very high temperature, feeling hot and shivery, nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea."

But for any normal UTI, while you wait for your treatment to kick in, or if you've been told you don't need antibiotics, it is possible to treat the irritating symptoms with some helpful home remedies. They can give you some relief from the irritation, and make you feel more comfortable.

So how effective are home remedies for a UTI? Some home remedies for a UTI can also help to prevent infections returning in the future - so read on if you want to stay healthy and happy 'down there'...

Home remedies for a UTI

A supplement called D-Mannose

Not strictly a home remedy, as you're unlike to have this already sitting waiting in your cupboard, but the NHS advise that D-Mannose can potentially help to treat UTIs by stopping certain types of bacteria from sticking to the walls of your urinary tract.

Gynaecologist Caroline Overton explained that rather than treat UTIs, the evidence suggests that it's more of a preventative measure. “The NICE guidance on UTIs reports a study that suggests that compared to no treatment, D-Mannose reduces recurrent UTIs in non-pregnant women."

And if you're pregnant, it's best to just steer clear, given the lack of research on the supplement, "Pregnant women should be cautious about using D-Mannose as there has not been enough research.”

D-Mannose comes in tablet form or powder form depending on how you prefer to take it, and can be bought from the likes of Holland & Barrett.

Cranberry juice or tablets

Cranberry juice is the UTI home remedy we've likely all heard of already - but does it actually work? Caroline has debunked the swirl of myths and theories surrounding the idea - revealing that while it won't cure UTIs for you, it can help to prevent them.

She said, "“There is a compound within cranberries which prevents bacteria from sticking and causing infection. There has been some research to suggest that cranberry juice or tablets can help with the prevention of UTIs, but they are not recommended to treat established infections.

But research is debated. "One study suggested that drinking 240mls of cranberry juice every day for 3.2 years prevented one recurrent UTI - and that’s a lot of cranberry juice!"Caroline told w&h.

MORE:A no nonsense guide to normal vaginas

You may also need to be careful not to drink too much cranberry juice if you're taking any blood-thinning medication. Caroline told us, "Cranberry juices often contain additives and a lot of sugar and they can interact with the medicine warfarin which thins the blood, so may cause other health issues in some women."

Avoid sex

Given that UTIs can themselves be caused by sex, it's best to steer clear until you're feeling better.

“With a UTI, the bladder and urethra (the pee tube) are inflamed and tender, " Caroline said. "Sex can be uncomfortable when you have a UTI. The urethra in women is short (only 3-4cm long) and sex can push bacteria into the urethra.”

Avoid making it worse - we'd recommend waiting a few days from when you first notice the infection.

Drinking plenty of water

Although it's always a good idea to drink as much water as possible whether you have an infection or not, keeping your fluid levels topped up during a UTI can actually provide some real relief and can even help to rid you of the painful symtoms. Caroline explained, “It is very important for women to drink lots of water when they have a UTI, as it can help to flush out infection."

Applying heat to your stomach

When you have tummy troubles of any kind, a good old hot water bottle can provide immeasurable comfort. And it's not just a placebo effect - popping something warm on your stomach can actually help to ease the pesky symptoms of a UTI.

"A hot water bottle or heat compress can help soothe the pain of a UTI. Paracetamol can be taken as a painkiller, but always check with your pharmacist" Caroline said.

Vitamin C

Vitamin C (also known as ascorbic acid) is essential for keeping your cells and skin healthy, as well as helping to heal any wounds or cuts. And while many of us get enough from the fruits and veg in our daily diet, taking it as a supplement could actually be beneficial for UTIs.

Caroline explained, “Vitamin C will not help with UTI symptoms, but research has shown that it may be beneficial in UTI prevention. It works by acidifying the urine which makes it more difficult for bacteria to stick."

But as ever, you'll need to be careful before you start taking it. "We don’t know the most effective dose or how often it should be taken," Caroline said. "Women should always contact their healthcare professional, such as a GP or pharmacist, before beginning any treatment."

There is also a lot you can do to try and prevent UTIs from happening in the first place.

"Things that can help prevent UTIs include making sure that your bladder is completely empty at the end of passing urine, wiping from front to back after going to the toilet, avoiding tight fitting clothes, peeing as soon as possible after sex and drinking plenty of fluids to stay hydrated," Caroline revealed.

We'll certainly be sticking to these rules going forward!

Источник: https://www.womanandhome.com/us/health-and-wellbeing/home-remedies-for-uti-328978/

Urinary tract infections (UTIs)

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) affect your urinary tract, including your bladder (cystitis), urethra (urethritis) or kidneys (kidney infection). UTIs may be treated with antibiotics, but they're not always needed.

Check if it's a urinary tract infection (UTI)

Symptoms of a UTI may include:

  • pain or a burning sensation when peeing (dysuria)
  • needing to pee more often than usual during the night (nocturia)
  • pee that looks cloudy
  • needing to pee suddenly or more urgently than usual
  • needing to pee more often than usual
  • blood in your pee
  • lower tummy pain or pain in your back, just under the ribs
  • a high temperature, or feeling hot and shivery
  • a very low temperature below 36C

Children

Children with UTIs may also:

  • have a high temperature – your child is feeling hotter than usual if you touch their neck, back or tummy
  • appear generally unwell – babies may be irritable and not feed properly
  • wet the bed or wet themselves
  • be sick

Older, frail people or people with a urinary catheter

In older, frail people, and people with a urinary catheter, symptoms of a UTI may also include:

  • changes in behaviour, such as acting confused or agitated
  • wetting themselves (incontinence) that is worse than usual
  • new shivering or shaking (rigors)

Non-urgent advice: See a GP if:

  • you have symptoms of a UTI for the first time
  • your child has symptoms of a UTI
  • you're a man with symptoms of a UTI
  • you're pregnant and have symptoms of a UTI
  • you're caring for an older, frail person who may have a UTI
  • you have symptoms of a UTI after surgery
  • your symptoms get worse or do not improve within 2 days
  • your symptoms come back after treatment
Information:

Coronavirus (COVID-19) update: how to contact a GP

It's still important to get help from a GP if you need it. To contact your GP surgery:

  • visit their website
  • use the NHS App
  • call them

Find out about using the NHS during COVID-19

Urgent advice: Get advice from 111 now if:

you think you, your child or someone you care for may have a UTI and:

  • a very high temperature, or feeling hot and shivery
  • a very low temperature below 36C
  • are confused, drowsy or have difficulty speaking
  • have not been for a pee all day
  • have pain in the lower tummy or in the back, just under the ribs
  • can see blood in their pee

These symptoms suggest a kidney infection, which can be serious if it's not treated.

111 will tell you what to do. They can arrange a phone call from a nurse or doctor if you need one.

Go to 111.nhs.uk or call 111.

What happens at your appointment

You'll be asked about your symptoms and may need to give a urine sample.

Treatment from a GP

Your doctor or nurse may offer self-care advice and recommend taking a painkiller.

They may give you a prescription for antibiotics if they think you may need them.

You may be asked to start taking these immediately, or to wait to see if your symptoms improve.

It's important to finish the whole course of antibiotics, even if you start to feel better.

Treatment from a GP for UTIs that keep coming back

If your UTI comes back after treatment, you may have a urine test and be prescribed different antibiotics.

Your doctor or nurse will also offer advice on how to prevent UTIs.

If you keep getting UTIs and regularly need treatment, a GP may give you a repeat prescription for antibiotics.

If you have been through the menopause, you may be offered a vaginal cream containing oestrogen.

Things you can do yourself

To help ease pain:

  • take paracetamol up to 4 times a day to reduce pain and a high temperature – for people with a UTI, paracetamol is usually recommended over NSAIDs such as ibuprofen or aspirin
  • you can give children liquid paracetamol
  • rest and drink enough fluids so you pass pale urine regularly during the day, especially during hot weather

It's important to follow the instructions on the packet so you know how much paracetamol you or your child can take, and how often.

It may also help to avoid having sex until you feel better.

You cannot pass a UTI on to your partner, but sex may be uncomfortable.

Taking cystitis sachets or cranberry products has not been shown to help ease symptoms of UTIs.

A pharmacist can help with UTIs

You can ask a pharmacist about treatments for a UTI. A pharmacist can:

  • offer advice on things that can help you get better
  • suggest the best painkiller to take
  • tell you if you need to see a GP about your symptoms

Some pharmacies offer a UTI management service and can prescribe antibiotics if they're needed.

Causes of urinary tract infections (UTIs)

UTIs are usually caused by bacteria from poo entering the urinary tract.

The bacteria enter through the tube that carries pee out of the body (urethra).

Women have a shorter urethra than men. This means bacteria are more likely to reach the bladder or kidneys and cause an infection.

Things that increase the risk of bacteria getting into the bladder include:

  • having sex
  • pregnancy
  • conditions that block the urinary tract – such as kidney stones
  • conditions that make it difficult to fully empty the bladder – such as an enlarged prostate gland in men and constipation in children
  • urinary catheters (a tube in your bladder used to drain urine)
  • having a weakened immune system – for example, people with diabetes or people having chemotherapy
  • not drinking enough fluids
  • not keeping the genital area clean and dry

How to prevent urinary tract infections (UTIs)

There are some things you can try to help prevent UTIs returning.

Do

  • wipe from front to back when you go to the toilet

  • keep the genital area clean and dry

  • drink plenty of fluids, particularly water – so that you regularly pee during the day and do not feel thirsty

  • wash the skin around the vagina with water before and after sex

  • pee as soon as possible after sex

  • promptly change nappies or incontinence pads if they're soiled

Don’t

  • do not use scented soap

  • do not hold your pee in if you feel the urge to go

  • do not rush when going for a pee – try to fully empty your bladder

  • do not wear tight, synthetic underwear, such as nylon

  • do not drink lots of alcoholic drinks, as they may irritate your bladder

  • do not have lots of sugary food or drinks, as they may encourage bacteria to grow

  • do not use condoms or diaphragms with spermicidal lube on them – try non-spermicidal lube or a different type of contraception

Other ways to prevent recurring UTIs

If you have more than 3 UTIs in 1 year, or 2 UTIs in 6 months, there are other things that may help prevent UTIs.

There is some evidence that women under 65 years old who keep getting UTIs may find it helpful to take:

  • a supplement called D-mannose – this is not recommended for pregnant women
  • cranberry products, such as juice or tablets

Speak to your doctor before taking any of these during pregnancy.

Be aware that D-mannose and cranberry products can contain a lot of sugar.

Page last reviewed: 18 November 2020
Next review due: 18 November 2023

Источник: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/urinary-tract-infections-utis/

Photographed by Ashley Armitage.

So, you have a urinary tract infection. You’re not alone. UTIs account for almost 25% of all bacterial infections in women, and 50-60% will have at least one UTI in their lifetime. (People with penises can also develop UTIs, but people with vaginas get them more frequently because our urethras are shorter, meaning bacteria can travel to the bladder more easily.)

Although they’re common and usually not serious, UTIs require prescription antibiotics to treat, so head to your doctor to get your diagnosis and your meds. If you leave your UTI untreated, the infection can spread to your kidneys and cause damage. However, along with taking your meds, there are a few things you can do at home to help alleviate symptoms and speed up recovery.

“Most symptoms will clear up within 24 to 48 hours of starting antibiotics, but anyone who’s had a UTI knows those first 24 hours can be the worst,” Jenna Ryan, CEO & Co-Founder of Uqora tells Refinery29. Here’s how to get through them.

Along with taking your meds, you can take an over-the-counter pain reliever such as Tylenol or Motrin. You can also take a phenazopyridine — a pain reliever that targets the urinary tract — such as Azo. “If you’ve taken it, you know it can turn your urine Gatorade orange, but if you haven’t, it’s good to know that so you can expect it and not be completely freaked out when it happens,” Ryan warns.

Although a UTI makes it hurt to pee, drinking lots of water and peeing frequently will make peeing less painful and help speed your recovery along. “Focus on staying super hydrated,” Ryan says. “You’ll keep flushing out the urinary tract.”

Avoid foods and drinks that can irritate your bladder

Caffeine, alcohol, citrus fruits, spicy foods, and artificial sweeteners can irritate your bladder as you’re recovering. Skip your morning coffee for a day or two — while you might be a bit tired in the morning, your urethra will thank you.

Be kind to your urethra and stay away from sex while you're recovering from your UTI. If you're prone to UTIs, it may make your infection worse. And even if you're not prone to UTIs, sex will likely be painful. "It's better to wait until your UTI has been completely treated, you have finished the complete course of antibiotics, and you don’t have any more symptoms" before having sex again, Doreen Chung, MD, a specialist in female urology at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center, previously told Refinery29.

Try cranberry... if you want

Cranberry juice is an often-suggested home remedy for UTIs, but it's not a cure-all. Cranberries contain A-type proanthocyanidins (PACs) and the simple sugar D-Mannose, both of which may help with UTI recovery, though research isn’t conclusive. One review of cranberry trials found that there is some evidence that cranberry juice may help prevent UTIs for people who have recurrent UTIs, though not for others. Cranberry capsules contain a higher concentration of these ingredients than cranberry juice, and some studies have indicated they may be more helpful than cranberry juice.

“My perspective is that it’s one of those topics where you can choose a study to corroborate your perspective on it either way, because there is so much conflicting research,” Ryan says. Drinking cranberry juice or taking a cranberry supplement won’t hurt, so you can decide if it’s worth a try — in addition to taking antibiotics.

Even if you feel better before you’re done taking your antibiotics, you should finish the full course to make sure that the UTI bacteria is all gone. “If you don’t, some bacteria can remain, which can lead to recurring infections and might make it more difficult to use the same antibiotics to treat future UTIs,” Ryan says.

See your doctor if symptoms remain

If you’re still seeing UTI symptoms after 48 hours, check in with your doctor. Ryan points out that some strains of UTIs are becoming antibiotic-resistant, so you may need to try a different kind of antibiotic. When you go in for your initial UTI diagnosis, make sure your doctor takes a urine sample (which they should be doing anyway) so they can tell which bacterial strain is causing your UTI.

Think about future prevention

After you’ve recovered, make a plan to prevent future UTIs. Ryan suggests taking a probiotic to restore your vaginal microbiome, because while your antibiotics kill off UTI bacteria, they also kill off the good bacteria that helps prevent yeast infections and bacterial vaginosis. If you have recurrent UTIs, your doctor may suggest taking a low-dose antibiotic regularly or using a UTI prevention product like Uqora’s. Even if this was your first UTI, taking preventative actions such as wiping correctly, peeing after sex, and staying hydrated is always a good idea.

Источник: https://www.refinery29.com/en-us/uti-home-remedies

Urinary tract infections (UTIs)

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) affect your urinary tract, including your bladder (cystitis), urethra (urethritis) or kidneys (kidney infection). UTIs may be treated with antibiotics, but they're not always needed.

Check if it's a urinary tract infection (UTI)

Symptoms of a UTI may include:

  • pain or a burning sensation when peeing (dysuria)
  • needing to pee more often than usual during the night (nocturia)
  • pee that looks cloudy
  • needing to pee suddenly or more urgently than usual
  • needing to pee more often than usual
  • blood in your pee
  • lower tummy pain or pain in your back, just under the ribs
  • a high temperature, or feeling hot and shivery
  • a very low temperature below 36C

Children

Children with UTIs may also:

  • have a high temperature – your child is feeling hotter than usual if you touch their neck, back or tummy
  • appear generally unwell – babies may be irritable and not feed properly
  • wet the bed or wet themselves
  • be sick

Older, frail people or people with a urinary catheter

In older, frail people, and people with a urinary catheter, symptoms of a UTI may also include:

  • changes in behaviour, such as acting confused or agitated
  • wetting themselves (incontinence) that is worse than usual
  • new shivering or shaking (rigors)

Non-urgent advice: See a GP if:

  • you have symptoms of a UTI for the first time
  • your child has symptoms of a UTI
  • you're a man with symptoms of a UTI
  • you're pregnant and have symptoms of a UTI
  • you're caring for an older, frail person who may have a UTI
  • you have symptoms of a UTI after surgery
  • your symptoms get worse or do not improve within 2 days
  • your symptoms come back after treatment
Information:

Coronavirus (COVID-19) update: how to contact a GP

It's still important to get help from a GP if you need it. To contact your GP surgery:

  • visit their website
  • use the NHS App
  • call them

Find out about using the NHS during COVID-19

Urgent advice: Get advice from 111 now if:

you think you, your child or someone you care for may have a UTI and:

  • a very high temperature, or feeling hot and shivery
  • a very low temperature below 36C
  • are confused, drowsy or have difficulty speaking
  • have not been for a pee all day
  • have pain in the lower tummy or in the back, just under the ribs
  • can see blood in their pee

These symptoms suggest a kidney infection, which can be serious if it's not treated.

111 will tell you what to do. They can arrange a phone call from a nurse or doctor if you need one.

Go to 111.nhs.uk or call 111.

What happens at your appointment

You'll be asked about your symptoms and may need to give a urine sample.

Treatment from a GP

Your doctor or nurse may offer self-care advice and recommend taking a painkiller.

They may give you a prescription for antibiotics if they think you may need them.

You may be asked to start taking these immediately, or to wait to see if your symptoms improve.

It's important to finish the whole course of antibiotics, even if you start to feel better.

Treatment from a GP for UTIs that keep coming back

If your UTI comes back after treatment, you may have a urine test and be prescribed different antibiotics.

Your doctor or nurse will also offer advice on how to prevent UTIs.

If you keep getting UTIs and are there any home remedies for uti need treatment, a GP may give you a repeat prescription for antibiotics.

If you have been through the menopause, you may be offered a vaginal cream are there any home remedies for uti oestrogen.

Things you can do yourself

To help ease pain:

  • take paracetamol up to 4 times a day to reduce pain and a high temperature – for people with a UTI, paracetamol is usually recommended over NSAIDs such as ibuprofen or aspirin
  • you can give children liquid paracetamol
  • rest and drink enough fluids so you pass pale urine regularly during the day, especially during hot weather

It's important to follow the instructions on the packet so you know how much paracetamol you or your child can take, and how often.

It may also help to avoid having sex until you feel better.

You cannot pass a UTI on to your partner, but sex may be uncomfortable.

Taking cystitis sachets or cranberry products has not been shown to help ease symptoms of UTIs.

A pharmacist can help with UTIs

You can ask a pharmacist about treatments for a UTI. A pharmacist can:

  • offer advice on things that can help you get better
  • suggest the best painkiller to take
  • tell you if you need to see a GP about your symptoms

Some pharmacies offer a UTI management service and can prescribe antibiotics if they're needed.

Causes of urinary tract infections (UTIs)

UTIs are usually caused by bacteria from poo entering the urinary tract.

The bacteria enter through the tube that carries pee out of the body (urethra).

Women have a shorter urethra than men. This means bacteria are more likely to reach the bladder or kidneys and cause an infection.

Things that increase the risk of bacteria getting into the bladder include:

  • having sex
  • pregnancy
  • conditions that block the urinary tract – such as kidney stones
  • conditions that make it difficult to fully empty the bladder – such as an enlarged prostate gland in men and constipation in children
  • urinary catheters (a tube in your bladder used to drain urine)
  • having a weakened immune system – for example, people with diabetes or people having chemotherapy
  • not drinking enough fluids
  • not keeping the genital area clean and dry

How to prevent urinary tract infections (UTIs)

There are some things you can try to help prevent UTIs returning.

Do

  • wipe from front to back when you go to the toilet

  • keep the genital area clean and dry

  • drink plenty of fluids, particularly water – so that you regularly pee during the day and do not feel thirsty

  • wash the skin around the vagina with water before and after sex

  • pee as soon as possible after sex

  • promptly change nappies or incontinence pads if they're soiled

Don’t

  • do not use scented soap

  • do not hold your pee in if you feel the urge to go

  • do not rush when going for a pee – try to fully empty your bladder

  • do not wear tight, synthetic underwear, such as nylon

  • do not drink lots of alcoholic drinks, as they may irritate your bladder

  • do not have lots of sugary food or drinks, as they may encourage bacteria to grow

  • do not use condoms or diaphragms with spermicidal lube on them – try non-spermicidal lube or a different type of contraception

Other ways to prevent recurring UTIs

If you have more than 3 UTIs in 1 year, or 2 UTIs in 6 months, there are other things that may help prevent UTIs.

There is some evidence that women under 65 years old who keep getting UTIs may find it helpful to take:

  • a supplement called D-mannose – this is not recommended for pregnant women
  • cranberry products, such as juice or tablets

Speak to your doctor before taking any of these during pregnancy.

Be aware that D-mannose and cranberry products can contain a lot of sugar.

Page last reviewed: 18 November 2020
Next review due: 18 November 2023

Источник: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/urinary-tract-infections-utis/

A UTI (urinary tract infection) can be painful, irritating, and downright tiresome. And sometimes, they can even be a little bit troubling for our overall health. But do home remedies for a UTI work?

You usually know if you've developed a UTI if you're peeing way more than usual, experience burning when you do go, smelly, cloudy pee, or if you have a random, dull ache in your stomach.

A UTI will leave you feeling generally groggy too, with an uncomfortable feeling below your waistline.

Women are actually far more likely to get a UTI than men, with almost half of all women guaranteed to experience at least one UTI in their lifetime according to the US National Library of Medicine.

MORE:Your vagina is ageing: a timeline of changes down there, from your 30s to your 60s

Urinary tract infections are sometimes caused by bacteria from your *ahem* excrement, entering your urinary tract (or, urethra), either by improper wiping, sex, or pure chance. Women have a far shorter urethra than men, explaining why UTIs happen far more to them. They can also occur during pregnancy, or to people who have a weakened immune system or conditions that block the urinary tract.

But some things can increase your risk of getting a UTI include:

  • having sex
  • wiping your bottom from back to front after going to the toilet
  • being younger than 1 or older than 75
  • being pregnant
  • using adiaphragmfor contraception
  • havingdiabetes
  • having a weakened immune system

A trip to the doctors can normally have you feeling better pretty quickly, with most GP's likely to provide antibiotics in order to treat the infection. However, Caroline Overton, Consultant Gynaecologist and Spokesperson for the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, explained that antibiotics are not always needed. She said, "Mild cases may get better by themselves within a few days."

You'll need to make sure to take the whole course, to stop your symptoms coming back, and should generally start feeling better in a few days. Very rarely will you experience more severe symptoms of a UTI, which could the need for a hospital stay and further tests. However, this is normally more common in men, children, or older people.

It's important that you do visit your GP, as, left untreated, UTIs can develop into something pretty nasty, with the potental to spread to your kidneys - which could make you seriously unwell. Caroline told w&h, "Women should seek help urgently from the GP or by phoning 111 if they have symptoms of a kidney infection; symptoms include pain in the sides or lower back, a very high temperature, feeling hot and shivery, nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea."

But for any normal UTI, while you wait for your treatment to kick in, or if you've been told you don't need antibiotics, it is possible to treat the irritating symptoms with some helpful home remedies. They can give you some relief from the irritation, and make you feel more comfortable.

So how effective are home remedies for a UTI? Some home remedies for a UTI can also help to prevent infections returning in the future - so read on if you want to stay healthy and happy 'down there'.

Home remedies for a UTI

A supplement called D-Mannose

Not strictly a home remedy, as you're unlike to have this already sitting waiting in your cupboard, but the NHS advise that D-Mannose can potentially help to treat UTIs by stopping certain types of bacteria from sticking to the walls of your urinary tract.

Gynaecologist Caroline Overton explained that rather than treat UTIs, the evidence suggests that it's more of a preventative measure. “The NICE guidance on UTIs reports a study that suggests that compared to no treatment, D-Mannose reduces recurrent UTIs in non-pregnant women."

And if you're pregnant, it's best to just steer clear, given the lack of research on the supplement, "Pregnant women should be cautious about using D-Mannose as there has not been enough research.”

D-Mannose comes in tablet form or powder form depending on how you prefer to take it, and can be bought from the likes of Holland & Barrett.

Cranberry juice or tablets

Cranberry huntington bank mortgage address is the UTI home remedy we've likely all heard of already - but does it actually work? Caroline has debunked the swirl of myths and theories surrounding the idea - revealing that while it won't cure UTIs for you, it can help to prevent them.

She said, "“There is a compound within cranberries which prevents bacteria from sticking and causing infection. There has been some research to suggest that cranberry juice or tablets can help with the prevention of UTIs, but they are not recommended to treat established infections.

But research is debated. "One study suggested that drinking 240mls of cranberry juice every day for 3.2 years prevented one recurrent UTI - and that’s a lot of cranberry juice!"Caroline told w&h.

MORE:A no nonsense guide to normal vaginas

You may also need to be careful not to drink too much cranberry juice if you're taking any blood-thinning medication. Caroline told us, "Cranberry juices often contain additives and a lot of sugar and they can interact with the medicine warfarin which thins the blood, so may cause other health issues in some women."

Avoid sex

Given that UTIs can themselves be caused by sex, it's best to steer clear until you're feeling better.

“With a UTI, the bladder and urethra (the pee tube) are inflamed and tender, " Caroline said. "Sex can be uncomfortable when you have a UTI. The urethra in women is short (only 3-4cm long) and sex can push bacteria into the urethra.”

Avoid making it worse - we'd recommend waiting a few days from when you first notice the infection.

Drinking plenty of water

Although it's always a good idea to drink as much water as possible whether you have an infection or not, keeping your fluid levels topped up during a UTI can actually provide some real relief and can even help to rid you of the painful symtoms. Caroline explained, “It is very important for women to drink lots of water when they have a UTI, as it can help to flush out infection."

Applying heat to your stomach

When you have tummy troubles of any kind, a good old hot water bottle can provide immeasurable comfort. And it's not just a placebo effect - popping something warm on your stomach can actually help to ease the pesky symptoms of a UTI.

"A hot water bottle or heat compress can help soothe the pain of a UTI. Paracetamol can be taken as a painkiller, but always check with your pharmacist" Caroline said.

Vitamin C

Vitamin C (also known as ascorbic acid) is essential for keeping your cells and skin healthy, as well as helping to heal any wounds or cuts. And while many of us get enough from the fruits and veg in our daily diet, taking it as a supplement could actually be beneficial for UTIs.

Caroline explained, “Vitamin C will not help with UTI symptoms, but research has shown that it may be beneficial in UTI prevention. It works by acidifying the urine which makes it more difficult for bacteria to stick."

But as ever, you'll need to be careful before you start taking it. "We don’t know the most effective dose or how often it should be taken," Caroline said. "Women should always contact their healthcare professional, such as a GP or pharmacist, before beginning any treatment."

There is also a lot you can do to try and prevent UTIs from happening in the first place.

"Things that can help prevent UTIs include making sure that your bladder is completely empty at the end of passing urine, wiping from front to back after going to the toilet, avoiding tight fitting clothes, peeing as soon as possible after sex and drinking plenty of fluids to stay hydrated," Caroline revealed.

We'll certainly be sticking to these rules going forward!

Источник: https://www.womanandhome.com/us/health-and-wellbeing/home-remedies-for-uti-328978/

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One of the most common bacterial infections that women suffer from is urinary tract infection (UTI). When the bacteria found in the gut find their way into the urinary tract, it leads to this infection. The symptoms include frequent and painful urination, cloudy urine, diarrhoea and abdominal pain. While are there any home remedies for uti drugs may resolve the issue, even home remedies work very well in this regard. The minor infections heal on their own in a few days, while the more serious ones might take a bit longer. Here are some home remedies for urinary tract infections.

  1. Have Plenty of Water

Doctors recommend that this is one of the most effective home remedies for treating infections of the urinary tract. Depending on how much one can accommodate, to heal the infection, drinking two to four litres of water helps. As the body produces more urine, the bacteria get flushed out.

  1. Urinate Frequently

Don’t hold in your urine as that leads to more bacterial multiplication in the bladder. Empty out the bladder often and as soon as the urge arises.

  1. Cranberry Juice – Nips it in the Bud

Drinking cranberry juice is very beneficial in treating UTIs. Cranberry and its juice prevent the growth of E.Coli, the most common culprit that causes these infections.

  1. Shun Bladder Irritants

Limit your intake of alcohol, caffeinated drinks, and colas when you have a bladder infection. The high amount of sugar in these drinks provide a perfect breeding ground for bacterial colonization.

  1. Probiotics Are Your Friend

The good bacteria found in yoghurt and fermented foods provide a line of defence against the infection-causing bacteria. Eating probiotic-rich foods help to increase the body’s natural bacteria and wards off infections.

  1. Wear Loose Clothes

Stay clean and dry by wearing loose-fitting, comfortable clothes. Wear clothes that let your skin breathe and avoid tight clothes. Avoid wearing nylon.

  1. Sip on Green Tea

Green tea has an important compound, catechin that has antimicrobial properties. It also works as a diuretic so helps the body flush out the harmful bacteria.

  1. Apple Cider Vinegar on an Empty Stomach

Add two tablespoons of apple cider vinegar in a glass of water and have on an empty stomach to ward off bladder infections. It is antibacterial and alkalizes the inner environment of the body.

  1. Garlic Power

Allicin, one of the compounds found in raw garlic that stops the growth of harmful bacteria. You could ffb ppr raw, crushed garlic or have garlic-infused water to stave off urinary infections. Also, read the health benefits of garlic.

  1. Gorge on Citrus fruits

Vitamin C increases the acidity in the urine, thus limiting the growth of bladder infections causing bacteria. Also, it boosts immunity.

By following most of these remedies you will be able to treat your bladder infection at home without depending on antibiotics or other prescription drugs.

Also Read: UTI Causes, Symptoms & Treatment 

Disclaimer: The information included at this site is for educational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for medical treatment by a healthcare professional. Because of unique individual needs, the reader should consult their physician to determine the appropriateness of the information for the reader’s situation.

Источник: https://pharmeasy.in/blog/10-home-remedies-for-urinary-tract-infection/

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Urinary tract infection in women

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Out of all of life’s many annoyances, UTIs rank pretty high (probably somewhere above “trip to the DMV,” but below “bridal party email thread”). If you have yet to actually experience one, consider yourself lucky: They’re inconvenient, incredibly uncomfortable and sometimes painful reminders that being a lady is super fun.

Urinary tract infections happen when bacteria gets trapped in the bladder, urethra, or any other part of the urinary system. While men do occasionally get them, they’re way more common in women (like, we get them 30 times as often as men do!). And that's down to anatomy: Because a woman’s urethra is shorter than a man’s, it’s easier for bacteria to enter and make itself at home.

Most UTIs are caused by E. coli, which can enter the urethra post-sex or after improper wiping. The bacteria can take root and replicate, leading to an infection of either the bladder (which is called cystitis) or urethra (called urethritis).

If you experience symptoms such as burning or painful urination, the urge to pee frequently (even when you know you don’t have to), cloudy or strange-smelling urine, or see blood or pus in your urine, you might have a UTI.

Left untreated, a UTI could easily spread to your kidneys and cause lasting damage, which is why you should make an appointment with your doctor stat. They’ll likely do a culture to determine if your symptoms are due to a UTI or some other infection and treat you accordingly. If you have a UTI, your doc will prescribe antibiotics, which (thankfully) get to work surprisingly quickly.

While you wait for the antibiotics to kick in, there are some easy natural remedies for UTIs that can help alleviate your symptoms and prevent UTIs in the future.

vitamin c pills supplement uti remedies

1. Drink more water

You should be drinking plenty of water anyway, but if you aren’t always great about remembering to fill up your water bottle in the middle of the day, it’s important to make an effort to increase your water intake if you’ve been diagnosed with (or suspect you have) a urinary tract infection. The more water you drink, the more you’ll have to pee; the more you pee, the more bacteria will be flushed out of your urethra every time you use the bathroom.

Upping your H20 consumption may also help prevent UTIs in the future, according to a 2017 study of 140 premenopausal women dealing with recurring infections. Study participants were divided into two groups; one group stuck to their usual water-drinking habits over the course of a year, while the other group drank an additional 1.5 liters of water a day (on top of their usual fluid intake). By the end of the study, the group drinking extra water saw a “significant” decrease in the mean number of infections compared to the control.

2. Reach for the (unsweetened) cranberry juice

Cranberries (and cranberry juice) have long been touted as a way to prevent urinary tract infections. That's because cranberries contain a specific kind of polyphenol (a compound found in plants) that acts on E. coli and other bacteria as an anti-adhesive, making it harder for the harmful microorganisms to stick to urethra walls.

However, it should be noted that research is mixed on the subject—most recently, a 2017 review found that "limited evidence exists for cranberries in reducing the risk of [recurrent UTIs]," and that "evidence for cranberry juice in preventing UTIs was less than previously thought," although it noted that there aren't any known downsides to drinking the stuff, either. (And some experts still recommend drinking cranberry juice as a preventative measure.)

If you do want to give cranberry juice a try, skip the cranberry cocktail in the juice aisle of your local grocery store and opt for the unsweetened variety instead. Sugary beverages can irritate your bladder, which will only make you feel worse than you already do. (BTW, you should also hold off on drinking coffee, alcohol and soda while you’re being treated for a UTI.)

3. Pop some vitamin C

In addition to its overall immunity-boosting properties, vitamin C may help reduce the risk of urinary tract infections by making urine more acidic, thereby limiting bacteria growth. The authors of the metastudy mentioned above also say that vitamin C plays quite nicely with methenamine hippurate (MH), an antibiotic commonly used to treat urinary tract infections. MH reacts with acid in the urine to create formaldehyde, which is deadly to E. coli and other bacteria. So basically vitamin C could help your antibiotics work even better.

4. Pee when you need to …

You may pride yourself on your ability to sit through marathon meetings without taking a bathroom break, but don’t sacrifice your bladder just because you don’t want to miss a minute of your boss’s riveting are there any home remedies for uti sales projections. If you habitually hold in your pee, research suggests you could be putting yourself at risk for a UTI. The longer urine sits in your bladder, the more time bacteria that has entered your urethra has to settle in and multiply.

5. …and definitely, definitely pee after sex

Although the jury is still out on whether or not there’s actually a relationship between peeing after intercourse and UTIs, there is some scientific evidence that women who go are there any home remedies for uti the bathroom before and after sex are much less likely to get UTIs than women who do not. (That same study also found that there may be a connection between diaphragm and spermicide use and UTIs.)

6. Apply heat

If you’re dealing with pain in your lower belly thanks to your UTI, a heating pad or hot water bottle may provide temporary relief.

7. Try garlic (extract) or bearberry leaf

A 2009 study of male rats showed a “statistically significant” drop in bacterial growth and inflammation when the rats were given garlic, while the author of a 2010 study found that garlic extract had an antimicrobial effect even on some antibiotic-resistant strains of S. aureus and E. coli. And in a small study of 57 women suffering from recurring UTIs, the group who supplemented with bearberry leaf (a.k.a. uva-ursi) saw a significant decrease in the number of recurring infections compared to the control group over the course of the year-long study.

It should be noted that these studies are small, and are there any home remedies for uti of them were only on rats or in a petri dish—so take these findings with a grain of salt. And as with all herbal supplements, talk to your doctor first to make sure they don't interact with any other meds you're taking.

Источник: https://www.wellandgood.com/natural-remedies-for-uti/

Did you know that cats have a low thirst drive? In the past, felines had a majority of their hydration needs met from the prey they ate rather than stopping to drink from water sources where they’d be open to attack. Because of this, cats are susceptible to a variety of urinary health concerns such as urinary tract disease and UTIs.

If your cat gets a UTI, there’s no need to panic. We’ve compiled 13 natural remedies for your cat’s UTI that you can try at home, as well as the common symptoms of a UTI to help you diagnose it. These solutions can help to relieve the discomfort associated with a UTI and reduce or eliminate the infection. But are there any home remedies for uti, the case is serious enough to warrant a trip to the vet, so we’ve also included the signs you should look out for.

Symptoms of a UTI in Cats

So, how do you know when your cat has a UTI? There are quite a few urinary problems that cats can develop, so it’s important to be sure that your cat has a UTI before you start treating it.

Other problems like lower urinary tract disease and bladder stones can sometimes have serious consequences and can even become life-threatening. These conditions may require professional help, but a simple UTI can often be effectively managed with home remedies.

If you see your cat straining to urinate or attempting to urinate but failing, then it’s likely caused by a UTI. Likewise, if your cat is crying or whining when they urinate and grooming excessively afterward, then it’s probably a UTI. Bloody urine is also a sign of a UTI.

While cats will always make use of the litter box under normal circumstances, they’ll often urinate outside the litter box if they have a UTI. They might also become very lethargic or develop a fever or even a sore back.

If you observe one or more of these symptoms in your cat, then they likely have a UTI and you can start administering a natural home remedy to help relieve the issue.

13 Natural Home Remedies For Cat UTIs

Once you’ve determined that your cat’s symptoms are congruent with a UTI, it’s time to start treating the issue with one of the following 13 natural home remedies. You can start anywhere you like and even combine these solutions to help heal your cat quickly.

1. Drink More Water

Dehydration can help to cause or exacerbate urinary tract problems like infections. When your cat isn’t getting enough water, the bacteria in their urinary tract have a chance to grow and multiply. These bacteria can often cause UTIs or even worse.

While drinking more water isn’t going to eliminate a UTI on its own, it will definitely help to reduce the symptoms, aid other cures in eradicating the UTI, and will also help to prevent more UTIs from occurring in the future. Ensure that your cat always has plenty of water and that it’s in an easily accessible place where they can always reach it.

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2. Glucosamine and Chondroitin

Glucosamine and chondroitin are two supplements that are commonly given to cats to ensure their joints remain healthy and supple as the cat ages. But as it turns out, these useful supplements can also help with FLUTD, feline lower urinary tract disease. This is different than a UTI, though repetitive UTIs can cause FLUTD.

But UTIs and FLUTD have very common symptoms and they can both be painful for the cat. Glucosamine has anti-inflammatory properties and can help to protect the bladder’s lining, especially when paired with chondroitin. This can help to reduce the level of discomfort your cat is experiencing while also allowing the UTI to heal faster.

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3. Juniper Berry

Juniper berry is an herb that helps the kidneys to effectively filter out impurities at a higher rate. This can, in turn, increase urine production, helping to flush your cat’s system out and expel the harmful bacteria that are infecting the urinary tract.

This herb has also been shown to work well at reducing inflammation, which can help to alleviate your cat’s suffering and reduce the pain they’re experiencing from the UTI. What’s more, juniper berry can also kill bacteria and fungi that are antibiotic-resistant, helping to completely kill any UTI your cat may be experiencing.

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4. Apple Cider Vinegar

Apple cider vinegar is an all-natural cure for several ailments that cats commonly suffer, including UTIs. But it can be harmful in heavy doses, so be sure to keep the dosage to a minimum.

Because apple cider is so acidic, it can help to prevent bacteria from growing in your cat’s urinary tract. This can help to reduce and eliminate any UTIs your cat is currently suffering from.

You’ll want to dilute the apple cider vinegar with water before giving it to your cat; never give them the apple cider vinegar straight.

For smaller cats under four pounds, a few drops added to their water each day will suffice. Larger cats that are over six pounds can have up to half a teaspoon each day. Medium-sized cats that fall between four and six pounds should be given 1/4-teaspoon each day.

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5. Echinacea

Echinacea is widely used to treat multiple types of infections in humans, including yeast infections and UTIs. But it can be just as helpful for your cat. It’s commonly used to treat a variety of infections in cats, particularly upper respiratory infections. Because it can kill infections, a small dose can help to relieve your cat’s UTI symptoms and alleviate the infection.

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6. Uva Ursi

Uva ursi has long been thought to be an antiseptic, diuretic, and antibacterial for the urinary tract. People have taken this herb and given it to their cats as well to treat UTIs.

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7. Cranberries

According to studies, drinking cranberry juice can help to cure a UTI in a person. It does this by preventing bacteria from adhering to the urinary tract. If the bacteria can’t stick to the urinary tract, then it can’t cause an infection.

Unfortunately, cranberry juice is too high in sugar to feed to your cat. But there are alternatives. You can try a few drops of a cranberry concentrate that won’t have as much sugar as cranberry juice.

Alternatively, you could get a pet-specific cranberry supplement such as Cranberry Relief by NaturVet. It’s a safe and effective way to supplement your cat’s diet with cranberries without giving them too much sugar. The formula also includes echinacea, so you’re getting extra protection against UTIs.

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8. D-Mannose

D-Mannose is a sugar that doesn’t get metabolized and doesn’t affect blood sugar levels. This is the same sugar that’s in cranberry juice that makes it an effective cure for UTIs in cats as well. Once consumed, bacteria in the bladder bond to the D-Mannose molecules. Then, the D-Mannose is excreted from the body in the urine, taking the offending bacteria with it.

If you’re looking for a D-Mannose supplement to help cure your cat’s UTI, then check out this one from Nature’s Pure Edge.

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9. Bone Broth

We’ve already discussed the importance of keeping your cat well hydrated when it comes to curing and preventing UTIs. But as the old saying goes: you can lead a cat to water but you can’t make it drink…or something like that. So, how do you get your cat more hydrated if you can’t force them to drink water?

Bone broth is a great alternative to plain water. It will help get lots of fluids into your cat to keep them well hydrated and will also provide helpful nutrients for fighting any existing infections. Cats love bone broth and you should have no difficulty getting your cat to drink some, so use this anytime you aren’t sure if your cat is hydrated enough.

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10. Nettle

Nettle is often used in UTI treatments for people. It’s a natural diuretic that helps to flush the system and increase urination. It also helps to reduce inflammation and pain.

But this helpful herb isn’t just for humans; it can also help when your cat has this unfortunate infection. It can help to flush the harmful bacteria from their system while reducing their discomfort are there any home remedies for uti even helping to alleviate the inflammation of their urinary tract.

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11. Parsley Leaf

Since hydration is such a key factor in healing UTIs and preventing them altogether, it’s important to get your cat to drink as much water as possible. Parsley naturally encourages thirst, so using some parsley leaf can help to get your cat drinking more water.

But that’s not where this herb’s usefulness ends. It’s also a natural diuretic with antibacterial properties. It will cause your cat to urinate more, which can help to flush the infection from their system. But it can also help kill the bacteria in your cat’s urinary tract, healing the infection.

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12. Marshmallow Root

Marshmallow root is full of a substance called mucilage, a mucus that helps to coat membranes, soothing irritation and reducing inflammation while killing off harmful bacteria. Moreover, marshmallow root gives a kickstart to the immune system, kills bacteria, and reduces inflammation.

When your cat has a UTI, the mucilage can help to reduce the discomfort and pain they’re experiencing since the urinary and digestive tracts are linked by mucus membranes. Meanwhile, it helps to kill off any bacteria that’s causing the UTI while also reducing the inflammation that’s causing your cat discomfort and pain. It’s also great for your cat’s digestive tract and can help reduce constipation and diarrhea as well.

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13. Corn Silk

Hydration is key to reducing or curing UTIs, so you may think that a diuretic would make things worse. But corn silk, a natural diuretic, can help to flush the system out by increasing water elimination. This means your cat will need to drink plenty of water!

But the combination of increased water intake and increased urination from the corn silk can help to flush your cat’s urinary tract and get rid of unhealthy bacteria, stones, crystals, and more.

How to Prevent UTIs in Cats

Once your cat has a UTI, you have to take whatever measures are available to cure it. But the best cure is to prevent it altogether. There are several steps you can take to help prevent UTIs in the future, mostly centered around proper hydration and nutrition.

Ensure Adequate Hydration

This has already been mentioned, but it’s so important that it warrants a repeat. Cats have a very low thirst drive and tend not to drink much water. This can be a major factor in UTIs and urinary tract disease.

To help prevent these unfortunate urinary tract complications from occurring, you’ll want to ensure your cat is always fully hydrated. This starts with leaving water within reach of your feline at all times, but that may not be enough.

Since their thirst drive is so low, you may need to entice your cat to drink through other methods. Try giving them bone broth; a tasty alternative to water that will hydrate them sufficiently and should be easy to get any cat to drink.

Use Canned Cat Food

For dogs, eating dry food is par for the course. But dogs don’t have a low thirst drive like cats. When you combine a low thirst drive with dry food that can actually dehydrate your cat further, you’re exacerbating the dehydration issue.

In the wild, cats get most of their water intake from the live food sources they eat. Your cat may be well domesticated, but you can still offer it hydration through its food by using canned cat food instead of dry food.

Canned cat food holds plenty of moisture that can help keep your cat hydrated. And you’ll probably never have a difficult time getting your cat to eat some moist cat food, even if they don’t seem to want to drink any water.

Avoid Stressful Situations

As it turns out, humans and cats are affected pretty similarly by stress. Just as your health can decline when you’re going through stressful situations or periods in your life, your cat’s health can erode when it becomes too stressed.

This stress can cause inflammation within the bladder, infections, and other health issues. By assuring your cat isn’t getting too stressed out, you can prevent a myriad of health concerns from becoming a reality.

When Should You Go To The Vet?

If left untreated, a UTI can get worse and cause additional problems for your feline. Bladder stones and even kidney infections can develop if the UTI isn’t addressed in time. Worse, UTIs can even lead to FLUTD.

At the first sign of any UTI symptoms, you might be able to head off the infection and cure it early with one or more of the at-home natural remedies we’ve shared with you. But if things continue to get worse, you’ll need to take your cat to see a professional and ensure it gets the proper care necessary for treating a full-blown UTI.

If your cat is completely unable to urinate, you’ll need to take it to the vet. Likewise, if you see that their urine is bloody, things might be getting serious and you need navy federal credit union certificate of deposit rates see a vet. Also, seek professional help if your cat is in high levels of pain.

Your vet can determine whether a UTI is the real issue or not and then treat the problem from there. They often use antibiotics to cure such ailments and this might be the only option if your cat’s UTI has progressed past the beginning stages.

Conclusion

UTIs are fairly common in cats, particularly due to their low thirst drive. By ensuring your cat is adequately hydrated by feeding it moist, canned food and getting it to drink plenty of fluids, you can help to prevent UTIs from ever developing. But if your cat does get a UTI, you can try some of our natural home remedies like apple cider vinegar, D-Mannose, or parsley leaf.

Remember, if your cat is in obvious pain, unable to urinate, or is peeing blood, you need to take it to the vet right away. If caught early enough, these natural remedies might help to heal and eliminate a UTI. But if it gets past the beginning stages, your cat might need antibiotics or other help that only a professional can offer.

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Featured Image Credit: photosforyou, Pixabay

Contents Overview

Christian Adams

An American expat living in Metro Manila, Philippines for over a decade, Christian is a lifelong cat lover and the proud papa of two rescue cats, Trixie and Chloe. Both girls were formerly among the first financial credit union routing number of strays that roam the cities and countryside. Three-year-old Trixie was pulled from a litter found under the porch of a neighbor’s house, while two-year-old Chloe was brought home by Christian’s young son, Henry, who found the kitten crying in the parking lot. As Editor in Chief of ExcitedCats.com, Christian is thrilled to be a part of the pro-feline movement.

Источник: https://excitedcats.com/natural-remedies-for-cat-utis/
are there any home remedies for uti

Are there any home remedies for uti -

What home remedies are there for bladder infections?

The Top 4 Home Remedies For a Bladder Infection


Written by Hammad Sadiq

 Read on to find out the answers to some commonly asked questions such as:

* What is the difference between a bladder infection and a UTI?

* Are there ways to treat my bladder infection at home?

* How do I know if it’s something more serious?

What is a Bladder Infection (Cystitis)?

Your bladder is like a sac, and its main role is to store urine. It’s essentially like a balloon, expanding when it’s full and relaxing when you empty it. When bacteria, such as e.coli, enters the bladder, it can easily multiply and this causes inflammation, otherwise known as Cystitis or a bladder infection.

You may hear the terms bladder infection and UTI used interchangeably, and whilst cystitis is a type of lower urinary tract infection, it is specific to the bladder and different from other types of UTI such as a kidney infection, for example.

Men and women have fairly different anatomies when it comes to the urethra, the tube which connects the bladder to the outside. Due to women having a shorter urethra, it’s much easier for bacteria to travel up to the bladder, and thus the risk of infection is higher.

What are the Symptoms of a Bladder Infection?

The most common symptoms to look out for in adults include:

* Having a strong and constant urge to urinate

* A strange burning sensation when passing urine

* Strong smelling or cloudy looking urine

* Discomfort in your pelvis or lower abdomen

A child with cystitis may present with some of the following symptoms:
* Pain in their tummy

* Needing to pee urgently and often

* A high fever of 38C (100.4F) or above

* Reduced appetite or vomiting

However, it’s important to note that sometimes a person with cystitis may not present any symptoms, or may only have one or two of these. Especially in the case of infants or children, the above symptoms may indicate other serious complications to so it’s important not to self diagnose. Further information on symptoms can be found here.

Is it Possible to Treat a Bladder Infection at Home?

Cystitis is usually not serious and will generally clear up on its own within 3-4 days. Non- pregnant women who have had cystitis before are recommended to treat at home or seek advice from a pharmacist. So what are some tried and tested ways to treat cystitis at home?

While these top 5 home remedies may not be clinically proven, some people swear by them for cystitis treatment and prevention, so they’re always worth a try:

1) Cranberry Juice

This is probably the most popular one you’ll come across as a time-weathered home remedy for UTI’s.

Cranberry juice is said to lower the acidity of your urine so whilst it won’t treat your cystitis, many people claim to have reduced symptoms when drinking cranberry juice. However, make sure to buy the pure cranberry juice, and not the high sugar content ‘juice drink’ variety as this could actually make symptoms worse.

 

2) Fluids, Fluids, and More Fluids

Water seems to be the solution for everything, however, for cystitis, it’s one of the primary home remedies. Plenty of water will mean your bladder is working efficiently and that bacteria is essentially being flushed out as your bladder fills and empties. It’s also completely safe and great for your skin and other organs!

 

3) Vitamin C

You may have heard about the wonderful benefits of vitamin C on skin and eyes, but you may not know that getting plenty of vitamin C can actually limit bacterial growth and increase immune function to help with cystitis. You can take vitamin C in a readily available supplement form, however getting it through your diet is best, and it’s not just lemons and oranges which contain high levels of vitamin C, bell peppers and leafy greens are also abundant forms of Vitamin C.

4) Hot Water Bottle

You can’t go wrong with a cuddle with your hot water bottle when you’re feeling unwell, and in the case of cystitis, holding it to your tummy or between your thighs will help to reduce the discomfort associated with a bladder infection.

I’ve Tried the Home Remedies- Is There Anything Else Available?

Cystitis which can’t be treated at home may need to be treated with prescription medication such as Trimethoprim, which you can get here via our online doctor service. This works by reducing the bacterial growth in the urinary tract which is causing the infection.

When is it Advisable to see a GP about a Bladder Infection?

Whilst Cystitis is fairly common in women, If you’re a man, pregnant woman or have a child who presents with cystitis symptoms, we’d encourage you to see the GP as it’s less common in these groups and may be considered more serious. The GP may wish to speak to you about other symptoms you’re having, your medical history and may perform a quick urine test to determine whether or not you need to take a course of antibiotics.

External Links

NHS - NHS Choices Conditions - Cystitis. Available: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/cystitis/. Last accessed January 2019
 

BUPA- Health Information- Cystitis.Available: https://www.bupa.co.uk/health-information/urinary-bladder-problems/cystitis. Last accessed January 2019
 
The information contained in this article is not a substitute for personalised medical advice. Should you have any concerns about your health please speak to your pharmacist or doctor.

Источник: https://www.simpleonlinepharmacy.co.uk/blog/home-remedies-for-bladder-infections/

Photographed by Ashley Armitage.

So, you have a urinary tract infection. You’re not alone. UTIs account for almost 25% of all bacterial infections in women, and 50-60% will have at least one UTI in their lifetime. (People with penises can also develop UTIs, but people with vaginas get them more frequently because our urethras are shorter, meaning bacteria can travel to the bladder more easily.)

Although they’re common and usually not serious, UTIs require prescription antibiotics to treat, so head to your doctor to get your diagnosis and your meds. If you leave your UTI untreated, the infection can spread to your kidneys and cause damage. However, along with taking your meds, there are a few things you can do at home to help alleviate symptoms and speed up recovery.

“Most symptoms will clear up within 24 to 48 hours of starting antibiotics, but anyone who’s had a UTI knows those first 24 hours can be the worst,” Jenna Ryan, CEO & Co-Founder of Uqora tells Refinery29. Here’s how to get through them.

Along with taking your meds, you can take an over-the-counter pain reliever such as Tylenol or Motrin. You can also take a phenazopyridine — a pain reliever that targets the urinary tract — such as Azo. “If you’ve taken it, you know it can turn your urine Gatorade orange, but if you haven’t, it’s good to know that so you can expect it and not be completely freaked out when it happens,” Ryan warns.

Although a UTI makes it hurt to pee, drinking lots of water and peeing frequently will make peeing less painful and help speed your recovery along. “Focus on staying super hydrated,” Ryan says. “You’ll keep flushing out the urinary tract.”

Avoid foods and drinks that can irritate your bladder

Caffeine, alcohol, citrus fruits, spicy foods, and artificial sweeteners can irritate your bladder as you’re recovering. Skip your morning coffee for a day or two — while you might be a bit tired in the morning, your urethra will thank you.

Be kind to your urethra and stay away from sex while you're recovering from your UTI. If you're prone to UTIs, it may make your infection worse. And even if you're not prone to UTIs, sex will likely be painful. "It's better to wait until your UTI has been completely treated, you have finished the complete course of antibiotics, and you don’t have any more symptoms" before having sex again, Doreen Chung, MD, a specialist in female urology at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center, previously told Refinery29.

Try cranberry... if you want

Cranberry juice is an often-suggested home remedy for UTIs, but it's not a cure-all. Cranberries contain A-type proanthocyanidins (PACs) and the simple sugar D-Mannose, both of which may help with UTI recovery, though research isn’t conclusive. One review of cranberry trials found that there is some evidence that cranberry juice may help prevent UTIs for people who have recurrent UTIs, though not for others. Cranberry capsules contain a higher concentration of these ingredients than cranberry juice, and some studies have indicated they may be more helpful than cranberry juice.

“My perspective is that it’s one of those topics where you can choose a study to corroborate your perspective on it either way, because there is so much conflicting research,” Ryan says. Drinking cranberry juice or taking a cranberry supplement won’t hurt, so you can decide if it’s worth a try — in addition to taking antibiotics.

Even if you feel better before you’re done taking your antibiotics, you should finish the full course to make sure that the UTI bacteria is all gone. “If you don’t, some bacteria can remain, which can lead to recurring infections and might make it more difficult to use the same antibiotics to treat future UTIs,” Ryan says.

See your doctor if symptoms remain

If you’re still seeing UTI symptoms after 48 hours, check in with your doctor. Ryan points out that some strains of UTIs are becoming antibiotic-resistant, so you may need to try a different kind of antibiotic. When you go in for your initial UTI diagnosis, make sure your doctor takes a urine sample (which they should be doing anyway) so they can tell which bacterial strain is causing your UTI.

Think about future prevention

After you’ve recovered, make a plan to prevent future UTIs. Ryan suggests taking a probiotic to restore your vaginal microbiome, because while your antibiotics kill off UTI bacteria, they also kill off the good bacteria that helps prevent yeast infections and bacterial vaginosis. If you have recurrent UTIs, your doctor may suggest taking a low-dose antibiotic regularly or using a UTI prevention product like Uqora’s. Even if this was your first UTI, taking preventative actions such as wiping correctly, peeing after sex, and staying hydrated is always a good idea.

Источник: https://www.refinery29.com/en-us/uti-home-remedies

A UTI (urinary tract infection) can be painful, irritating, and downright tiresome. And sometimes, they can even be a little bit troubling for our overall health. But do home remedies for a UTI work?

You usually know if you've developed a UTI if you're peeing way more than usual, experience burning when you do go, smelly, cloudy pee, or if you have a random, dull ache in your stomach.

A UTI will leave you feeling generally groggy too, with an uncomfortable feeling below your waistline.

Women are actually far more likely to get a UTI than men, with almost half of all women guaranteed to experience at least one UTI in their lifetime according to the US National Library of Medicine.

MORE:Your vagina is ageing: a timeline of changes down there, from your 30s to your 60s

Urinary tract infections are sometimes caused by bacteria from your *ahem* excrement, entering your urinary tract (or, urethra), either by improper wiping, sex, or pure chance. Women have a far shorter urethra than men, explaining why UTIs happen far more to them. They can also occur during pregnancy, or to people who have a weakened immune system or conditions that block the urinary tract.

But some things can increase your risk of getting a UTI include:

  • having sex
  • wiping your bottom from back to front after going to the toilet
  • being younger than 1 or older than 75
  • being pregnant
  • using adiaphragmfor contraception
  • havingdiabetes
  • having a weakened immune system

A trip to the doctors can normally have you feeling better pretty quickly, with most GP's likely to provide antibiotics in order to treat the infection. However, Caroline Overton, Consultant Gynaecologist and Spokesperson for the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, explained that antibiotics are not always needed. She said, "Mild cases may get better by themselves within a few days."

You'll need to make sure to take the whole course, to stop your symptoms coming back, and should generally start feeling better in a few days. Very rarely will you experience more severe symptoms of a UTI, which could the need for a hospital stay and further tests. However, this is normally more common in men, children, or older people.

It's important that you do visit your GP, as, left untreated, UTIs can develop into something pretty nasty, with the potental to spread to your kidneys - which could make you seriously unwell. Caroline told w&h, "Women should seek help urgently from the GP or by phoning 111 if they have symptoms of a kidney infection; symptoms include pain in the sides or lower back, a very high temperature, feeling hot and shivery, nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea."

But for any normal UTI, while you wait for your treatment to kick in, or if you've been told you don't need antibiotics, it is possible to treat the irritating symptoms with some helpful home remedies. They can give you some relief from the irritation, and make you feel more comfortable.

So how effective are home remedies for a UTI? Some home remedies for a UTI can also help to prevent infections returning in the future - so read on if you want to stay healthy and happy 'down there'...

Home remedies for a UTI

A supplement called D-Mannose

Not strictly a home remedy, as you're unlike to have this already sitting waiting in your cupboard, but the NHS advise that D-Mannose can potentially help to treat UTIs by stopping certain types of bacteria from sticking to the walls of your urinary tract.

Gynaecologist Caroline Overton explained that rather than treat UTIs, the evidence suggests that it's more of a preventative measure. “The NICE guidance on UTIs reports a study that suggests that compared to no treatment, D-Mannose reduces recurrent UTIs in non-pregnant women."

And if you're pregnant, it's best to just steer clear, given the lack of research on the supplement, "Pregnant women should be cautious about using D-Mannose as there has not been enough research.”

D-Mannose comes in tablet form or powder form depending on how you prefer to take it, and can be bought from the likes of Holland & Barrett.

Cranberry juice or tablets

Cranberry juice is the UTI home remedy we've likely all heard of already - but does it actually work? Caroline has debunked the swirl of myths and theories surrounding the idea - revealing that while it won't cure UTIs for you, it can help to prevent them.

She said, "“There is a compound within cranberries which prevents bacteria from sticking and causing infection. There has been some research to suggest that cranberry juice or tablets can help with the prevention of UTIs, but they are not recommended to treat established infections.

But research is debated. "One study suggested that drinking 240mls of cranberry juice every day for 3.2 years prevented one recurrent UTI - and that’s a lot of cranberry juice!"Caroline told w&h.

MORE:A no nonsense guide to normal vaginas

You may also need to be careful not to drink too much cranberry juice if you're taking any blood-thinning medication. Caroline told us, "Cranberry juices often contain additives and a lot of sugar and they can interact with the medicine warfarin which thins the blood, so may cause other health issues in some women."

Avoid sex

Given that UTIs can themselves be caused by sex, it's best to steer clear until you're feeling better.

“With a UTI, the bladder and urethra (the pee tube) are inflamed and tender, " Caroline said. "Sex can be uncomfortable when you have a UTI. The urethra in women is short (only 3-4cm long) and sex can push bacteria into the urethra.”

Avoid making it worse - we'd recommend waiting a few days from when you first notice the infection.

Drinking plenty of water

Although it's always a good idea to drink as much water as possible whether you have an infection or not, keeping your fluid levels topped up during a UTI can actually provide some real relief and can even help to rid you of the painful symtoms. Caroline explained, “It is very important for women to drink lots of water when they have a UTI, as it can help to flush out infection."

Applying heat to your stomach

When you have tummy troubles of any kind, a good old hot water bottle can provide immeasurable comfort. And it's not just a placebo effect - popping something warm on your stomach can actually help to ease the pesky symptoms of a UTI.

"A hot water bottle or heat compress can help soothe the pain of a UTI. Paracetamol can be taken as a painkiller, but always check with your pharmacist" Caroline said.

Vitamin C

Vitamin C (also known as ascorbic acid) is essential for keeping your cells and skin healthy, as well as helping to heal any wounds or cuts. And while many of us get enough from the fruits and veg in our daily diet, taking it as a supplement could actually be beneficial for UTIs.

Caroline explained, “Vitamin C will not help with UTI symptoms, but research has shown that it may be beneficial in UTI prevention. It works by acidifying the urine which makes it more difficult for bacteria to stick."

But as ever, you'll need to be careful before you start taking it. "We don’t know the most effective dose or how often it should be taken," Caroline said. "Women should always contact their healthcare professional, such as a GP or pharmacist, before beginning any treatment."

There is also a lot you can do to try and prevent UTIs from happening in the first place.

"Things that can help prevent UTIs include making sure that your bladder is completely empty at the end of passing urine, wiping from front to back after going to the toilet, avoiding tight fitting clothes, peeing as soon as possible after sex and drinking plenty of fluids to stay hydrated," Caroline revealed.

We'll certainly be sticking to these rules going forward!

Источник: https://www.womanandhome.com/us/health-and-wellbeing/home-remedies-for-uti-328978/

Deep insights into urinary tract infections and effective natural remedies

This review was based on data extracted from published papers with the search terms of urinary tract infection, herbal medicine, vitamin, probiotics, supplements, and antibacterial resistance which are available in all relevant databases, especially PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, MEDLINE, and EMBASE, without limitation up to August 1, 2020.

Herbal medicine

In recent years, the use of medicinal herbs in the prevention and treatment of various diseases has been increased [13, 21]. Complimentary therapy with medicinal herbs is a research area that may be deserving of special attention. The complementary therapy of antibiotics with medicinal herbs showed mainly synergistic effects [11]. In many studies, herbal medicines could reduce bacterial resistance to antibiotics, remarkably [15, 16]. So, in many cases, patients may benefit from this type of therapy. It was shown that herbal medicines could play an important role in the treatment of a type of UTI [22]. Since several plant antimicrobial compounds contain various functional groups in their structure, the antimicrobial activities are attributed to multiple mechanisms [13]. The chemical compounds presented in herbal medicines evolved to protect the plant from pathogenic microorganisms and therefore could prevent or treat infections in animals. Many of these compounds are renally excreted so that they are specifically useful as urinary antiseptic agents. Two major mechanisms are involved in the antimicrobial properties of these compounds. Some of them directly kill microbes and some of them interfere with microbial adhesion to epithelial cells [23]. These herbs play an important role in assisting to resolve UTI. Here, we briefly review the role of medicinal herbs and their variant in the treatment of infections. Some of these herbal medicines with more details are illustrated in Fig. 1.

Used herbal medicines in the treatment of UTI. The active constituents with the related mechanism of action(s) are also described

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Arctostaphylos uva-ursi

Arctostaphylos uva-ursi (bearberry) is a plant species of the genus Arctostaphylos. The leaves of this plant have been traditionally used because of their diuretic properties [23]. The plant has been used for the treatment of infectious diseases, especially for UTIs. The herb is approved in Germany for the treatment of bladder infections and effective against E. coli in the bladder [24].

The leaves of the plant are responsible for the therapeutic actions which contain the glycoside arbutoside. This compound is hydrolyzed in the bowel to glucose and the aglycone hydroquinone which is absorbed and glucuronidated in the liver. Hydroquinone glucuronide is then carried to the kidneys and excreted in the urine. In the alkaline condition of urine, the hydroquinone glucuronide will decompose automatically and hydroquinone which is worked as a direct antimicrobial agent will be released [23].

It should be noted that based on information from laboratory researches exposure to synthetic hydroquinone for the long-term may be carcinogenic, so that it is recommended the consecutive consumption of this herbal medicine should not be extended more than two weeks.

Tannins presented in this plant could potentiate the in vitro antibacterial activities of β-lactam antibiotics against methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Consequently, due to that whole plant extracts contain other constituents that increase antibacterial activities, it is recommended to use whole plant extracts instead of isolated arbutoside.

Juniperus communis

Juniperus communis (juniper), which belongs to the Cupressaceae family, and other closely related species including Juniperus monosperma (Engelm) Sarg and Juniperus osteosperma (Utah juniper) show remarkable antimicrobial activities [25]. It was reported that terpenoids in the leaf of the herbs are responsible for the antibacterial and diuretic activities of the herbs [23]. Schilcer reported that Juniper oil was effective against urinary tract infections [26]. Leaf and berries of the plant show antimicrobial activities against urinary tract infections. The main antibacterial constituent of this plant is terpinen-4-ol, a volatile oil, which plays an important role in the treatment of UTIs [27]. This plant also contains other active agents such as oxygenated sesquiterpene, β-pinene, sabinene, monoterpene hydrocarbons, limonene, and myrcene [22]. It should be noted that the volatile oil of juniper contains nephrotoxic compounds, especially hydrocarbon terpenoids. However, these adverse effects might only be seen after receiving high doses which far exceeded the therapeutic dose [23].

It was indeed previously demonstrated that the extracts presented diuretic activity [27]. The juniper leaf infusions show more diuretic activity than the volatile oil, which suggests that other constituents contribute to the diuretic activity of the herb.

Vaccinium macrocarpon (cranberry)

Many researchers have suggested that cranberry is active against UTIs. The plant belongs to Ericaceae family and can be potentially active against E. coli, the leading causes of bacteria-mediated UTIs, by reduction of bacterial attaching to the walls of the bladder, and then, the bacteria are more likely to be washed out during urination. Cranberry juice intake leads to measurable protection against both sensitive and resistant strains of E. coli [28]. It could also inhibit the binding of bacteria to gastrointestinal mucosa [29]. It was shown that cranberry juice consumption reduced the biofilm formation of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive uropathogens [30, 31].

Cranberry contains proanthocyanidins, which are stable phenolic compounds and contribute to the anti-adhesion activity against E. coli. Also, the in vitro antibacterial activities of cranberry extracts and juice against other pathogens such as S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, K. pneumoniae, and P. mirabilis have been previously demonstrated [32]. Cranberry proanthocyanidins mainly contain A-type and B-type linkages, while in comparison with B-type linkage, A-type linkage is more effective in preventing adhesion of P-fimbriated uropathogenic E. coli to uroepithelial cells of the bladder and responsible for anti-adhesion activities of the extract, therefore inhibiting the ability of E. coli to infect the urinary mucosa [33, 34].

Cranberry also contains other biologically active constituents such as anthocyanidin, catechin, flavanols, myricetin, quercetin, and phenolics which are supposed to be responsible for its activities [35].

The other possible mechanism of action of cranberry might be related to acidification of the urine; however, it only causes temporary effects, and the changes last about 15 min in most people. Therefore, this mechanism could not be of relevance.

Due to these health benefits of cranberry extract, different commercial formulations of the extract exist in the market. In acute situations, the usual dose of the juice is 250–500 ml two to three times daily and for prevention consumption of 250–500 ml per day is enough. The solid dosage forms such as capsules that contain concentrated cranberry extract are also available. In acute situations, taking 2–3 capsules two to four times per day and taking 1 two to three times daily for prevention are recommended [36].

In summary, the existing data indicate the beneficial effects of cranberry preparations against UTIs; however, these effects are mainly related to prophylactic activities by preventing the development of infections or in combination with conventional antibiotics and solely intake of the herb is not recommended for UTI treatment.

Vaccinium myrtillus (Blueberry)

Blueberry has extensively been used traditionally to treat and prevent UTI. Blueberry extracts contain similar constituents as cranberry extracts, and the extracts possess similar anti-adhesive activities against uropathogenic bacteria and the bacteria are significantly less able to adhere to the walls of the bladder [24, 37]. Tannins are the most active constituents of blueberry extracts against UTI.

Cinnamomum verum (Cinnamon)

Cinnamon belongs to the Lauraceae family and shows antioxidant and antibacterial activities. It contains bioactive phytochemical compounds such as trans-cinnamaldehyde, eugenol, trans-cinnamyl acetate, and proanthocyanidins which have been used in the treatment of UTI.

Amalaradjou et al. showed that trans-cinnamaldehyde as an essential oil was able to inhibit biofilm formation of E. coli on urinary catheters by downregulating major virulence genes in the bacteria.

Various mechanisms are involved in antibacterial activities of essential oils: (I) due to their hydrophobicity, these molecules could target the lipid-containing bacterial cell membrane and mitochondria and alter the permeability which finally leads to leakage of ions and other cell contents, (II) inhibiting energy generation and glucose uptake, and (III) inhibiting activities of important enzymes such as amino acid decarboxylases [38].

Agathosma betulina (buchu)

A. betulina is one of the oldest known herbs for the treatment of uncomplicated UTI [39]. The leaves of the herb contain various phenolic compounds and have been used as an herbal remedy for urinary tracts, because of the diuretic and antiseptic properties. In a study, it was demonstrated that the ethanolic leaf extract of A. betulina showed antibacterial activities against E. coli, K. pneumoniae, P. mirabilis, P. aeruginosa, S. aureus, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, and E. faecalis [40]. For a preparation containing the leaves extract of A. betulina, the anti-adhesive properties were investigated, and the results showed the anti-adhesive effects of the preparation by interacting with T24 cells [41].

Hybanthus enneaspermus

H. enneaspermus was studied to evaluate the in vitro antibacterial activity of various types of extracts against the major UTI including E. coli, P. aeruginosa, K. pneumoniae, P. mirabilis, E. faecalis, and S. aureus. Among the extracts, ethanol extract showed the most antibacterial activities against the pathogens. The extract has various bioactive compounds such as flavonoids, terpenes, phenolic, and alkaloids that the therapeutic values are attributed to the presence of them.

Armoracia rusticana (horseradish)

A. rusticana (synonyms: Cochlearia armoracia, Radicula armoracia), which belongs to the family Brassicaceae, traditionally has been used to treat UTI. It shows favorable results for the prevention of recurrent UTI in pediatric patients [42]. It was demonstrated that the isothiocyanates of horseradish are responsible for their antibacterial activities of the herb. It was shown that these bioactive compounds could block the pathogenic process of human cell penetration by uropathogenic E. coli [43].

Hydrastis canadensis (Goldenseal)

H. canadensis (Goldenseal) has been used traditionally to treat various diseases such as digestive disorders, UTI, and skin diseases and also to check internal hemorrhage [44]. The rhizome, rootlets, and root hairs of the herb produce bioactive alkaloids and isoquinoline alkaloids [45]. These bioactive compounds may act similarly to proanthocyanidins, which are found in cranberry, in inhibiting bacteria from sticking to the bladder walls [24].

Berberine is a bioactive herbal alkaloid which presents in various medicinal plants such as H. Canadensis, Berberis aquifolium, B. vulgaris, and B. aristata [13]. This compound has been used in the treatment of UTI [46]. Notably, berberine exerts its antibacterial activities against UTI with interfering adhesion of E. coli to bladder epithelium.

Equisetum arvense (Horsetail)

E. arvense (Horsetail) is one of the oldest and most famous herbal medicine. The plant has a vast variety of therapeutic properties such as antibacterial activities [47, 48]. It was shown that the ethanol extract of the herb showed antibacterial activities against urinary tract pathogens including E. coli, K. pneumonia, P. mirabilis, P. aeruginosa, S. aureus, S. saprophyticus, and E. faecalis. The commonly known phytochemical compounds from Horsetail are alkaloids, phytosterols, tannin, triterpenoids, and phenolics [49]. Among them, phenolic compounds, especially flavonoids, present in the plant extracts are responsible for the antibacterial activities [50]. The essential oil of the herb was shown to possess broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities against tested strains.

Urtica dioica (nettle)

U. dioica (nettle) is a perennial plant of the Urticaceae family and has been traditionally used for the treatment of various diseases such as arthritis, rheumatism, UTI, kidney stones, and gingivitis [51].

It was shown that the plant extracts exhibit antimicrobial activities against various Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria such as Bacillus subtilis, Lactobacillus plantarum, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, K. pneumoniae, S. aureus, and S. epidermidis [52]. The leaf of the herb is a valuable source of biologically active compounds that show antimicrobial activities and could be used to treat infectious diseases [53].

It should be noted that the role of nettle in the treatment of UTI might be due to the diuretic activities of the herb [54].

Plantago major L.

P. major L. belongs to the Plantagináceae family and is used traditionally for the treatment of several diseases such as infectious diseases, pain relief, and reducing fever. The major chemical compositions of the herb include mucilage, organic acids, polysaccharides, and flavonoids. The herb traditionally has been used in Iran for pulmonary infections, stomach ulcers, and infections [55].

Other herbs

The essential oil of Salvia officinalis showed inhibitory activities against clinically isolated uropathogens [56]. Barosma betulina has been used traditionally for the treatment of various diseases such as UTI, catarrhal cystitis, and urethritis. The in vitro studies showed its antimicrobial effects against uropathogens. Other herbs that have been used for the treatment of UTIs but are not yet adequately studied include Mentha piperita, Allium sativum, Terminalia chebula, Taraxacum officinalis, and Zingiber officinale [22].

Nutrition therapy

Using nutrients is an integral part of the management, prevention, and treatment of UTIs. In most cases, micronutrients have been used to this end and they are included vitamins and minerals in general. The role of each agent in the prevention or treatment of UTIs is illustrated in Fig. 2.

The role of nutrition therapy in the prevention and treatment of UTIs. The ingredients with the related mechanism of action(s) are also described

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Vitamins

Vitamin C possesses antimicrobial activities and is frequently used as an important supplement to antibiotic therapy for UTI [57]. Vitamin C is considered as a non-enzymatic antioxidant that slows down the production of free radicals and oxidation, which leads to strengthening the immune system and the deficiencies of vitamin C could place the persons at risk for infections due to the negative impacts on immune function [58]. Various studies have been conducted to show the efficacy of vitamin C in the management of UTIs. Yousefichaijan et al. studied the efficacy of vitamin C supplementation on UTI in children for 14 days. The results showed that vitamin C supplementation was able to control the symptoms of UTI, including dysuria, fever, urinary urgency, and also dribbling urine [59]. Ochoa et al. investigated the role of a daily intake of vitamin C for its effect on UTIs during pregnancy. They showed that daily usage of vitamin C has significant effects on the reduction of UTIs and also improving the health level of the women [60]. The formation of struvite stones is associated with UTIs by urease-producing bacteria. It was shown that the vitamin can modulate the struvite crystal formation in the presence of uropathogenic bacteria [61]. In another study, the combination of cranberries, a probiotic (Lactobacillus rhamnosus), and vitamin C has been used to evaluate the clinical benefits due to their additive or synergistic effects. The results showed that the approach might represent a safe and effective option in UTI management [62]. It was shown that nitrite may be generated by bacteria in urine during UTI. Acidification of nitrite leads to the formation of nitric oxide (NO) and other reactive nitrogen oxides that are toxic for a wide range of microorganisms. In a study, NO formation and bacterial growth in mildly acidified urine containing nitrite and vitamin C as a reducing agent were investigated. The growth of bacteria was markedly reduced by the addition of nitrite to acidified urine. Additionally, the inhibition was enhanced by vitamin C. These results help to explain the bacteriostatic effects of acidified nitrite because of the release of NO and other toxic reactive nitrogen intermediates and also the role of vitamin C in the treatment and prevention of UTI [63].

The positive role of vitamin A supplementation in the prevention and treatment of UTI has been mentioned previously [64]. Vitamin A has been used in the management of UTIs in children. The results of the study indicated that in the group of the children who received 200,000 IU of the vitamin in combination with antibiotics, the incidence of UTIs was lower than the control group [65]. In another study, vitamin A supplementation in addition to antimicrobial therapy was used to improve UTI symptoms and preventing renal scarring in girls who suffer from acute pyelonephritis. The results showed that vitamin A supplementation is an effective approach for improving the clinical symptoms of UTI and also reducing the renal injury and scarring following acute pyelonephritis [66]. Sobouti et al. studied the effects of vitamin A or E supplementation in addition to antimicrobial therapy for the prevention of renal scarring in acute pyelonephritis. According to the results, vitamins A or E supplements were effective in reducing renal scarring secondary to acute pyelonephritis [67]. The other study was conducted to determine the effect of vitamin A supplementation on the rate of permanent renal damage in children with acute pyelonephritis. It was demonstrated that the administration of vitamin A leads to a significant reduction in permanent renal damage [68].

Different mechanisms have been mentioned for the implication of vitamin D on the management of UTI. It was shown that tight junction proteins play important roles in preventing the bacterial invasion of the epithelial barrier and supplementation with vitamin D could strengthen the urinary bladder lining and restore the bladder epithelial integrity [69]. Additionally, on the one hand, vitamin D could act as a local immune response mediator in UTI and on the other hand, enhancing vitamin D levels leads to modulate the innate immune system and provides a protective response to infection [70, 71]. The relation between the status serum level of vitamin D and the risk of UTI has been studied extensively, and the results showed a significant association between increased risk of UTI and vitamin D insufficiency, as an independent risk factor, especially in children [72,73,74]. Women with vitamin D deficiencies show a higher risk level of UTI during pregnancy [75]. Vitamin D deficiency is common and the proven risk factor for UTIs especially in girls and supplementation with vitamin D could prevent first-time UTI [76]. In a randomized clinical trial, the subjects who received vitamin D3 (20,000 IU per week) for five years showed better prevention against UTI [77]. Together, these results demonstrate that vitamin D supplementation provides a potent weapon in the prevention of UTI.

Minerals

The role of zinc in the management of the infectious disease has been described extensively [17, 78]. It was shown that the element increases the response to treatment in many infections and active against different pathogens such as E. coli, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Salmonella typhi, and Streptococcus pyogenes [79,80,81]. The incidence of zinc deficiency in infectious disease clinics has been reported extensively [82, 83]. The results of the Mohsenpour et al. study showed that serum zinc levels in people with recurrent UTI were lower than those in the control group. So, the zinc level could be assumed as a risk factor for recurrent UTI [84]. In another study, the relation between serum zinc levels in children inflicted with UTI and the control group was assessed. According to the data, lower zinc levels were associated with susceptibility to UTI, and therefore, zinc administration has been suggested [85].

Microbial infections are often associated with selenium deficiencies. The main physiological properties of this micronutrient are directly attributed to its presence within selenoproteins [11]. Selenium at a certain concentration was effective in preventing uropathogenic E. coli biofilm formation on urinary catheters. Further, the inhibitory effects were associated with a reduction in EPS production and gene expression of the bacteria. Additionally, at higher concentrations, selenium was effective in inactivating preformed bacterial biofilms on catheters within 3 days of incubation. These observations suggested that selenium could be potentially used in the control of bacterial biofilms on the catheters [86]. Also, it was shown that selenium-containing analogs of L-proline and L-cystine are effective in the treatment of UTI [87]. A study was conducted to compare the blood level of retinol and selenium in a person who suffered from minor lower urinary lesions. The results showed that there was a significant difference in the mean blood level of selenium between cases and control groups [88].

Copper, Cu, is an essential micronutrient for optimal innate immune function, and the nutritional deficiency of this element leads to increased susceptibility to bacterial infections [11]. During clinical UTI, uropathogenic E. coli upregulated the expression of copper efflux genes in patients. And, this element as a host effector could be involved in protection against pathogen colonization of the urinary tract [89]. Moreover, Cu export transport in bacteria has been addressed as an important virulence and fitness determinants during UTI [90]. Copper supplementation in drinking water has been suggested as an effective approach to reducing E. coli colonization in the urinary bladder of the animal model [91].

Other agents

Citrate salts could be used in the management of UTI due to their ability to alkalinize the urine, and alkaline urine is helpful for UTI symptoms such as dysuria. It was shown that by the administration of sodium citrate in women with UTI problems for 48 h, the symptoms were significantly improved in 80 percent of the subjects [92]. Additionally, alkalinity in the urine provides an effective environment for some of the antimicrobial agents such as uva-ursi and berberine to perform their function [37]. The role of these salts in the treatment of urinary candidiasis has been mentioned in an earlier study [93].

Simple sugars such as D-mannose could prevent the adherence of pathogens to uroepithelial cells. Various evidences show that the implementation of mannose exerts beneficial results in the treatment of UTI. It was shown that a mannose-specific lectin exists on the surface of adherent strains of E. coli and the sugar acts as the primary bladder cell receptor site for UPEC to bind [94]. Likewise, it was reported that in the adhesion of UPEC to the uroepithelial cells, the first step is the binding of FimH adhesin to the bladder epithelium through the interaction of mannose moieties with the host cell surface [95]. So, the use of the sugar or its analogs can help to block the adhesion of E. coli to the bladder epithelium. The efficacy of these sugars in controlling UTI has been studied previously [96,97,98].

An in vivo study indicated that demonstrated D-mannose in mice not only blocked adhesion of E. coli to the epithelium of the urinary tract but also prevent bacterial invasion and biofilm formation [99]. Also, in the presence of D-mannose, the adherence of clinical isolates of E. coli was inhibited remarkably [100]. Oral supplementation of D-mannose decreases the perception of lower urinary tract symptoms in postmenopausal women [101]. The results of another study indicated that D-mannose efficiently blocked the adhesive properties of all type 1 fimbriae-positive isolates of E. coli in low concentration, but did not show any bacteriostatic effects [102]. The results of another study demonstrated that antibiotic therapy in combination with long-term enrichment of the diet with D-mannose leads to prolongation of the inter-relapse period of uncomplicated UTI [97].

The effects of different derivatives of the sugar in the control of UTIs were studied. Klein et al. synthesized and evaluated the efficacy of these sugars in blocking bacterial-host interaction. Among them, para-substituted biphenyl derivative was the most effective agent in controlling UTIs. Following oral administration of this compound, bacterial numbers were reduced by twofold and fourfold in the urine and bladder, respectively [103].

Probiotics

Probiotics are living microorganisms which when administered in certain numbers exert a health benefit on the host [104]. The clinical efficacy of probiotics for adjunct treatment in the treatment of different gastrointestinal and urinary tract infections has been addressed previously [105]. They have demonstrated positive effects in the treatment and prevention of rotavirus diarrhea and alleviation of the antibiotic-associated intestinal adverse effects by recognizing the commensal microbiota and also restoration of the microbial ecosystem after an imbalance or infection [106]. Probiotics are clinically proven to be effective in the management of UTI including accelerating recovery after UTI and also decreasing recurrent UTI in children [107]. It must be emphasized that, for better effectiveness of probiotics, they must be able to colonize in the intestinal and/or urogenital region [108]. These positive effects of probiotics might be attributed to the intrinsic properties of microorganisms. For example, lactobacilli are able to grow in an environment with pH ≤ 4.5, where they could multiply and produce additional antibacterial molecules, such as bacteriocin and hydrogen peroxide [109, 110]. Besides these advantages, probiotics could produce biosurfactants that inhibit the growth of uropathogens by reducing the adhesion of the pathogens to the uroepithelium. Moreover, lactobacilli could co-aggregate with uropathogens and block their adhesion to the urinary tract and also displace previously adherent uropathogens from uroepithelium. This process can create a microenvironment in which the inhibitory products of lactobacilli can concentrate on the pathogens and therefore inhibit the pathogens [111]. It is worth noting that the most effective lactobacilli for controlling UTI are L. rhamnosus GR-1 and L. reuteri B-54 and RC-14 which have been proven [108].

The common vaginal Lactobacillus species were used to investigate the inhibition of E. coli growth. The results showed that when L. crispatus was incubated with clinical E. coli strains, the growth of E. coli was inhibited in the acidic environment [112]. Wolff et al. studied the changes in the ratio between uropathogens and Lactobacillus (U/L) within the lower UTI in response to oral probiotic supplementation. Based on the results, there were no changes between groups in terms of microbiota diversity and the use of oral probiotic did not alter the U/L ratio [113]. The physicochemical cell surface, adhesion properties, and the antagonistic activity of recombinant Lactococcus lactis containing the Ama r 2 gene against the E. coli causing UTI in humans were studied. The results indicated that this recombinant probiotic showed desirable properties and the Ama r 2 gene expression did not affect the positive probiotic properties [114].

The ability of a clinically isolated probiotic, L. fermentum strain 4–17, to adhere to human intestinal was studied. L. fermentum strain 4–17 showed appropriate anti-adhesive properties against human pathogenic bacteria [115].

Osset et al. [116] studied the antimicrobial activities of 15 Lactobacillus species against pathogens. Among them, L. crispatus could block pathogen adhesion efficiently.

The results of another study revealed that a pyelonephritic E. coli was sensitive to L. rhamnosus, Bifidobacterium lactis, and Bifidobacterium longus and these probiotics were able to suppress the growth of enteric and urinary pathogens [117].

Oral administration of multispecies probiotic formulations showed antimicrobial activities against the pathogens that are responsible for vaginal dysbiosis and infections [118].

The effects of vaginal suppositories of probiotics for the prevention and treatment of UTI have been studied previously. The concept for instilling probiotic into the vagina might be related to the belief that by the presence of probiotic as the dominant bacterium the ascension of uropathogens into the bladder was restricted by various mechanisms, such as interfering with pathogen adhesion, biofilm formation reduction, reducing the expression of virulence factors, and also modulation of the host’s defense systems to better combat infection [108]. The Lactobacillus strains inhibited the growth of E. coli via the production of organic acids. Additionally, the adhesion and internalization of E. coli into HeLa cells were reduced by probiotics [119]. Reid et al. investigated the effect of probiotic lactobacilli in controlling acute UTI in women. Based on the results, recurrence reduced remarkably in the Lactobacillus group compared to the placebo group [120].

Taken together, the results of these aforementioned studies demonstrated the potential benefit of probiotics in controlling UTI.

Additionally, site-oriented probiotic therapy has been recognized as one of the most promising therapeutic alternatives for the prevention of UTI in post-antibiotic therapy [112].

While most clinical research showed using these natural substances represents a promising approach, further studies are needed to prove their mechanism of action and clinical effectiveness. It should be noted that formulating these substances in a single dosage form and their side effects and interactions with each other are the main limitations of developing a new formulation.

Источник: https://afju.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s12301-020-00111-z

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One of the most common bacterial infections that women suffer from is urinary tract infection (UTI). When the bacteria found in the gut find their way into the urinary tract, it leads to this infection. The symptoms include frequent and painful urination, cloudy urine, diarrhoea and abdominal pain. While prescription drugs may resolve the issue, even home remedies work very well in this regard. The minor infections heal on their own in a few days, while the more serious ones might take a bit longer. Here are some home remedies for urinary tract infections.

  1. Have Plenty of Water

Doctors recommend that this is one of the most effective home remedies for treating infections of the urinary tract. Depending on how much one can accommodate, to heal the infection, drinking two to four litres of water helps. As the body produces more urine, the bacteria get flushed out.

  1. Urinate Frequently

Don’t hold in your urine as that leads to more bacterial multiplication in the bladder. Empty out the bladder often and as soon as the urge arises.

  1. Cranberry Juice – Nips it in the Bud

Drinking cranberry juice is very beneficial in treating UTIs. Cranberry and its juice prevent the growth of E.Coli, the most common culprit that causes these infections.

  1. Shun Bladder Irritants

Limit your intake of alcohol, caffeinated drinks, and colas when you have a bladder infection. The high amount of sugar in these drinks provide a perfect breeding ground for bacterial colonization.

  1. Probiotics Are Your Friend

The good bacteria found in yoghurt and fermented foods provide a line of defence against the infection-causing bacteria. Eating probiotic-rich foods help to increase the body’s natural bacteria and wards off infections.

  1. Wear Loose Clothes

Stay clean and dry by wearing loose-fitting, comfortable clothes. Wear clothes that let your skin breathe and avoid tight clothes. Avoid wearing nylon.

  1. Sip on Green Tea

Green tea has an important compound, catechin that has antimicrobial properties. It also works as a diuretic so helps the body flush out the harmful bacteria.

  1. Apple Cider Vinegar on an Empty Stomach

Add two tablespoons of apple cider vinegar in a glass of water and have on an empty stomach to ward off bladder infections. It is antibacterial and alkalizes the inner environment of the body.

  1. Garlic Power

Allicin, one of the compounds found in raw garlic that stops the growth of harmful bacteria. You could have raw, crushed garlic or have garlic-infused water to stave off urinary infections. Also, read the health benefits of garlic.

  1. Gorge on Citrus fruits

Vitamin C increases the acidity in the urine, thus limiting the growth of bladder infections causing bacteria. Also, it boosts immunity.

By following most of these remedies you will be able to treat your bladder infection at home without depending on antibiotics or other prescription drugs.

Also Read: UTI Causes, Symptoms & Treatment 

Disclaimer: The information included at this site is for educational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for medical treatment by a healthcare professional. Because of unique individual needs, the reader should consult their physician to determine the appropriateness of the information for the reader’s situation.

Источник: https://pharmeasy.in/blog/10-home-remedies-for-urinary-tract-infection/

Out of all of life’s many annoyances, UTIs rank pretty high (probably somewhere above “trip to the DMV,” but below “bridal party email thread”). If you have yet to actually experience one, consider yourself lucky: They’re inconvenient, incredibly uncomfortable and sometimes painful reminders that being a lady is super fun.

Urinary tract infections happen when bacteria gets trapped in the bladder, urethra, or any other part of the urinary system. While men do occasionally get them, they’re way more common in women (like, we get them 30 times as often as men do!). And that's down to anatomy: Because a woman’s urethra is shorter than a man’s, it’s easier for bacteria to enter and make itself at home.

Most UTIs are caused by E. coli, which can enter the urethra post-sex or after improper wiping. The bacteria can take root and replicate, leading to an infection of either the bladder (which is called cystitis) or urethra (called urethritis).

If you experience symptoms such as burning or painful urination, the urge to pee frequently (even when you know you don’t have to), cloudy or strange-smelling urine, or see blood or pus in your urine, you might have a UTI.

Left untreated, a UTI could easily spread to your kidneys and cause lasting damage, which is why you should make an appointment with your doctor stat. They’ll likely do a culture to determine if your symptoms are due to a UTI or some other infection and treat you accordingly. If you have a UTI, your doc will prescribe antibiotics, which (thankfully) get to work surprisingly quickly.

While you wait for the antibiotics to kick in, there are some easy natural remedies for UTIs that can help alleviate your symptoms and prevent UTIs in the future.

vitamin c pills supplement uti remedies

1. Drink more water

You should be drinking plenty of water anyway, but if you aren’t always great about remembering to fill up your water bottle in the middle of the day, it’s important to make an effort to increase your water intake if you’ve been diagnosed with (or suspect you have) a urinary tract infection. The more water you drink, the more you’ll have to pee; the more you pee, the more bacteria will be flushed out of your urethra every time you use the bathroom.

Upping your H20 consumption may also help prevent UTIs in the future, according to a 2017 study of 140 premenopausal women dealing with recurring infections. Study participants were divided into two groups; one group stuck to their usual water-drinking habits over the course of a year, while the other group drank an additional 1.5 liters of water a day (on top of their usual fluid intake). By the end of the study, the group drinking extra water saw a “significant” decrease in the mean number of infections compared to the control.

2. Reach for the (unsweetened) cranberry juice

Cranberries (and cranberry juice) have long been touted as a way to prevent urinary tract infections. That's because cranberries contain a specific kind of polyphenol (a compound found in plants) that acts on E. coli and other bacteria as an anti-adhesive, making it harder for the harmful microorganisms to stick to urethra walls.

However, it should be noted that research is mixed on the subject—most recently, a 2017 review found that "limited evidence exists for cranberries in reducing the risk of [recurrent UTIs]," and that "evidence for cranberry juice in preventing UTIs was less than previously thought," although it noted that there aren't any known downsides to drinking the stuff, either. (And some experts still recommend drinking cranberry juice as a preventative measure.)

If you do want to give cranberry juice a try, skip the cranberry cocktail in the juice aisle of your local grocery store and opt for the unsweetened variety instead. Sugary beverages can irritate your bladder, which will only make you feel worse than you already do. (BTW, you should also hold off on drinking coffee, alcohol and soda while you’re being treated for a UTI.)

3. Pop some vitamin C

In addition to its overall immunity-boosting properties, vitamin C may help reduce the risk of urinary tract infections by making urine more acidic, thereby limiting bacteria growth. The authors of the metastudy mentioned above also say that vitamin C plays quite nicely with methenamine hippurate (MH), an antibiotic commonly used to treat urinary tract infections. MH reacts with acid in the urine to create formaldehyde, which is deadly to E. coli and other bacteria. So basically vitamin C could help your antibiotics work even better.

4. Pee when you need to …

You may pride yourself on your ability to sit through marathon meetings without taking a bathroom break, but don’t sacrifice your bladder just because you don’t want to miss a minute of your boss’s riveting quarterly sales projections. If you habitually hold in your pee, research suggests you could be putting yourself at risk for a UTI. The longer urine sits in your bladder, the more time bacteria that has entered your urethra has to settle in and multiply.

5. …and definitely, definitely pee after sex

Although the jury is still out on whether or not there’s actually a relationship between peeing after intercourse and UTIs, there is some scientific evidence that women who go to the bathroom before and after sex are much less likely to get UTIs than women who do not. (That same study also found that there may be a connection between diaphragm and spermicide use and UTIs.)

6. Apply heat

If you’re dealing with pain in your lower belly thanks to your UTI, a heating pad or hot water bottle may provide temporary relief.

7. Try garlic (extract) or bearberry leaf

A 2009 study of male rats showed a “statistically significant” drop in bacterial growth and inflammation when the rats were given garlic, while the author of a 2010 study found that garlic extract had an antimicrobial effect even on some antibiotic-resistant strains of S. aureus and E. coli. And in a small study of 57 women suffering from recurring UTIs, the group who supplemented with bearberry leaf (a.k.a. uva-ursi) saw a significant decrease in the number of recurring infections compared to the control group over the course of the year-long study.

It should be noted that these studies are small, and some of them were only on rats or in a petri dish—so take these findings with a grain of salt. And as with all herbal supplements, talk to your doctor first to make sure they don't interact with any other meds you're taking.

Источник: https://www.wellandgood.com/natural-remedies-for-uti/

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Источник: https://www.cvs.com/shop/health-medicine/pain-fever/urinary-tract-infection
are there any home remedies for uti
are there any home remedies for uti

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